Baseball signed by Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, and Walter Johnson in 1939 sells for a record $623K

Baseball signed by Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, and Walter Johnson in 1939 sells for a record $623K

‘The most important and valuable autographed baseball in the world’: Souvenir signed by Babe Ruth, Cy Young, Ty Cobb, and Honus Wagner at the Hall of Fame’s first induction ceremony sells for a record $623K

  • Former Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox third baseman Marv Owen got 11 signatures at Cooperstown’s first induction ceremony on a single baseball in ’39
  • Owen preserved the ball in a fur-lined glove that he kept in a safe deposit box
  • Although Owen passed away in 1991, the ball was auctioned off on Saturday for a record $623,369 – nearly doubling the previous record for a signed baseball
  • The largest price ever paid for a baseball was $3 million, which is what one collector spent in 1999 for Mark McGwire’s 70th home run ball from 1998  

Alex Raskin Sports News Editor For Dailymail.com

Former Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox third baseman Marv Owen’s impact on professional baseball may be unremarkable, but the late Major Leaguer helped set a record over the weekend when a ball he had autographed by 11 members of the inaugural Hall of Fame class in 1939 was sold at auction for a whopping $623,369.

Those who signed the most valuable autographed baseball ever include sluggers Babe Ruth and Ty Cobb as well as legendary pitchers Cy Young and Walter Johnson. The missing signature on the ball is that of Lou Gehrig, who was too sick with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to attend the first induction ceremony. 

Prior to his death in 1991, Owen had the foresight to store the ball in a fur-lined glove that he kept in a safe deposit box, which is why the piece is in such good condition.

Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, and Honus Wagner are just three of the 11 signatures on the ball 

Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, and Honus Wagner are just three of the 11 signatures on the ball 

Marv Owen got 11 signatures on a baseball in 1939 that sold for $623,369 on Saturday night

Marv Owen got 11 signatures on a baseball in 1939 that sold for $623,369 on Saturday night

Legendary sluggers Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, and Honus Wagner are just three of the 11 signatures found on the ball, which former Tigers third baseman Marv Owen (right) passed around at the first Hall of Fame induction ceremony in Cooperstown, New York in 1939 

According to ESPN , the previous record for a signed baseball was $388,375 in 2012 for a souvenir with Babe Ruth's signature. Ruth was a member of baseball's first Hall of Fame class

According to ESPN , the previous record for a signed baseball was $388,375 in 2012 for a souvenir with Babe Ruth's signature. Ruth was a member of baseball's first Hall of Fame class

According to ESPN , the previous record for a signed baseball was $388,375 in 2012 for a souvenir with Babe Ruth’s signature. Ruth was a member of baseball’s first Hall of Fame class

‘The sheer greatness of this ball is simply unrivaled,’ SCP Auctions president David Kohler said in a statement. ‘Its historical importance compounded by the impeccable provenance and state of preservation elevate it to singular status as the most important and valuable autographed baseball in the world. The final price certainly proved this.’

The induction ceremony in 1939 included Hall of Fame classes from 1936 to 39. 

Other members of that class include former Pittsburgh Pirates shortstop Honus Wagner, Philadelphia Athletics second baseman Eddie Collins, St. Louise Browns first baseman George Sisler, Cleveland Naps second baseman Nap Lajoie (the team’s namesake), Boston Red Sox and Cleveland Indians center fielder Tris Speaker, as well as Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander, and Athletics manager Connie Mack. 

(From left) Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Babe Ruth were all inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown in 1939, but Gehrig was too sick with ALS to attend  

(From left) Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Babe Ruth were all inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown in 1939, but Gehrig was too sick with ALS to attend  

(From left) Lou Gehrig, Tris Speaker, Ty Cobb, and Babe Ruth were all inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown in 1939, but Gehrig was too sick with ALS to attend  

Ty Cobb was not the most popular baseball player ever, but he was a member of the first Hall of Fame class in 1936. He was inducted into Cooperstown in 1939 when the museum opened

Ty Cobb was not the most popular baseball player ever, but he was a member of the first Hall of Fame class in 1936. He was inducted into Cooperstown in 1939 when the museum opened

Grover Cleveland Alexander, with the St. Louis Cardinals at Spring Training in Avon Park, Florida

Grover Cleveland Alexander, with the St. Louis Cardinals at Spring Training in Avon Park, Florida

Ty Cobb (left) and Grover Cleveland Alexander (right) both signed the nearly-priceless ball

Honus Wagner memorabilia is quite valuable. His baseball card has sold for over $2 million

Honus Wagner memorabilia is quite valuable. His baseball card has sold for over $2 million

Honus Wagner memorabilia is quite valuable. His baseball card has sold for over $2 million

The price hit $156,000 on Friday night, but things progressed quickly from there, and by Saturday the ball had sold for over $600,000.  

According to ESPN, the previous record for a signed baseball was $388,375 in 2012 for a souvenir with Ruth’s signature.

The largest price ever paid for a baseball was $3 million, which is what collector Todd McFarlane spent in 1999 for Mark McGwire’s 70th home run ball from the previous season.

Valuable collectibles have been popping up in the news frequently.

Earlier this month, two New Jersey men were stunned to discover five Mickey Mantle cards had been stored in an old stash, one of which was valued at $1 million.

A 76-year-old man who asked to be identified only by his first name, John, saw that former NFL lineman Evan Mathis sold  Mickey Mantle card for $2.88 million. 

Eddie Collins of the Philadelphia Athletics poses for a portrait during the 1911 World Series against the New York Giants circa October, 1911 at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Eddie Collins of the Philadelphia Athletics poses for a portrait during the 1911 World Series against the New York Giants circa October, 1911 at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Denton 'Cy' Young warms up before a game

Denton 'Cy' Young warms up before a game

(Left) Eddie Collins of the Philadelphia Athletics poses for a portrait during the 1911 World Series against the New York Giants circa October, 1911 at Shibe Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Right) Denton ‘Cy’ Young warms up before a game 

Walter Johnson (known as 'The Big Train') was the game's top pitcher for nearly 20 years 

Walter Johnson (known as 'The Big Train') was the game's top pitcher for nearly 20 years 

Walter Johnson (known as ‘The Big Train’) was the game’s top pitcher for nearly 20 years 

Outfielder Tris Speaker of the Boston Red Sox takes batting practice at the South End Grounds in Boston in 1912

Outfielder Tris Speaker of the Boston Red Sox takes batting practice at the South End Grounds in Boston in 1912

Nap Lajoie, second and first baseman for the Philadelphia Athletics, poses for a portrait, circa 1900

Nap Lajoie, second and first baseman for the Philadelphia Athletics, poses for a portrait, circa 1900

Former Red Sox center fielder Tris Speaker (left) and Philadelphia Athletics second baseman Nap Lajoie (right) were considered two of the best hitters before the ‘live ball’ era (1920-) 

That’s when John decided to call Heritage Auctions to have them evaluate his cards.

As it turns out, he and his brother’s collection includes five Mantle Topps cards from 1952, similar to the one Mathis sold. However, that card was graded a Mint 9 by PSA, one of the leading sports memorabilia authenticators.

The best in the brothers’ collection is a PSA 8.5 that has been valued at $1 million by Heritage and is part of its Summer Platinum Night Sports Auction that runs through Aug. 19.

John recalled he and his brother began collecting cards in 1951 when they were growing up in West Hartford, Connecticut. John was nine-years old at the time, and brother Ed was 12. They each had separate collections that got merged at some point years later as they were being stored. 

There was a big attic in their house and John said a lot of things were stored there over the years after they were no longer being used, including his Cub scout uniform and his Army uniforms. At some point the cards went up there, too.

That’s where they remained until his mother passed away in late 2006. Her house was sold and her belongings were divided between John and his brother, who lives in Massachusetts. The cards ended up in John’s basement.

‘We always knew we had the cards, but they were just in the attic,’ John told the Associated Press. ‘We were fortunate our mother stayed and lived in the house until she was almost 102.’

Walter Johnson pitches for the  Senators in the season opener at the Polo Grounds in 1916

Walter Johnson pitches for the  Senators in the season opener at the Polo Grounds in 1916

Walter Johnson pitches for the Senators in the season opener at the Polo Grounds in 1916

In perhaps Ty Cobb's most iconic photo, the Georgia Peach shows off his base-running skills.

In perhaps Ty Cobb's most iconic photo, the Georgia Peach shows off his base-running skills.

George Sisler poses at the steps of the visitors dugout, League Park

George Sisler poses at the steps of the visitors dugout, League Park

(Left) In perhaps Ty Cobb’s most iconic photo, the Georgia Peach shows off his base-running skills. (Right) George Sisler poses at the steps of the visitors dugout, League Park

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Chicago Cubs fan who 'stole baseball from child'

Chicago Cubs fan who 'stole baseball from child'

Chicago Cubs fan who was condemned online for ‘stealing a baseball from a small boy’ had already given THREE away to him and other children

  • Social media erupted in fury when an older fan sat behind the boy picked up ball
  • It had been tossed towards the young fan by Cubs first base coach Will Venable 
  • But Javier Báez later gave the boy a signed ball to make up for his missing out
  • Later still it was revealed the adult fan had earlier helped boy win a different ball

Ian Burns

and
George Martin For Mailonline

A man who was filmed seemingly depriving a child of a baseball tossed into the crowd at a Chicago Cubs game had already given the boy a ball – according to the team.

Social media commentators launched into an unbridled tirade against the older fan after the clip was posted last week. 

But according to the Cubs the man had already caught four other balls during the game – one of which he had given to the boy in question. 

Social media erupted in fury when an older fan sat behind the boy picked up the ball and handed it to a woman sat next to him

Social media erupted in fury when an older fan sat behind the boy picked up the ball and handed it to a woman sat next to him

Social media erupted in fury when an older fan sat behind the boy picked up the ball and handed it to a woman sat next to him

There was a scramble for it when it was thrown towards the boy and it ended up rolling under the seats and into the hands of the man behind

There was a scramble for it when it was thrown towards the boy and it ended up rolling under the seats and into the hands of the man behind

There was a scramble for it when it was thrown towards the boy and it ended up rolling under the seats and into the hands of the man behind

‘I spoke to the boy’s mother today and can confirm the man did not steal the ball from the boy, based on information we received from his mother,’ Cubs spokesman Julian Green told the Chicago Tribune

‘In fact, the man gave several balls to children in the same section and his wife as an anniversary present. We hope this first experience won’t ruin his trip to Chicago and Wrigley Field, and we invite him to come back soon.’ 

The man also released a statement through the Cubs, which said in part: ‘I am not ‘that guy’ that the media and social media made me out to be.’  

In the clip, the older fan sat behind the boy can be seen picking up the ball and handing it to a woman sat next to him.

There was a scramble for it when it was thrown towards the boy and it ended up rolling under the seats and into the hands of the man behind. 

The young fan was rewarded with a signed ball after the incident after infielder Javier Báez, who spotted the rush for the ball, decided to intervene.

But infielder Javier Báez, who spotted the rush for the ball, decided to give the boy another ball - this one signed - to make up for his missing out during the game

But infielder Javier Báez, who spotted the rush for the ball, decided to give the boy another ball - this one signed - to make up for his missing out during the game

But infielder Javier Báez, who spotted the rush for the ball, decided to give the boy another ball – this one signed – to make up for his missing out during the game

The Cubs official Twitter account later posted pictures of the boy smiling with his two balls

The Cubs official Twitter account later posted pictures of the boy smiling with his two balls

The Cubs official Twitter account later posted pictures of the boy smiling with his two balls

Another man who said he was sitting next to the fan who picked up the ball explained that the boy had ‘already had a ball’ during the game.

‘The same guy helped him get [it],’ Chuck Mycoff wrote, adding that the man did not even keep the second ball but gave it to a different child.

He went on: ‘He handed it to his wife. She took a picture of it and they gave it to the kid next to them. This guy was great. This story is BAD.’

This was later confirmed by NBC Chicago’s David Kaplan. 

He tweeted: ‘I spoke with people from the Cubs. The man who grabbed the ball on the widely seen video had actually already helped the little boy get a ball earlier. 

‘The young man has a game used ball and a Javy Baez ball. All is well. Guy is A-OK so let it go people.’    

The Cubs official Twitter account posted pictures of the boy smiling with his two balls after the game.  

It was accompanied by a short statement: ‘A signed @javy23baez ball should take care of it. #EverybodyIn.’

The Cubs tweet was accompanied by a short statement: 'A signed @javy23baez ball should take care of it. #EverybodyIn'

The Cubs tweet was accompanied by a short statement: 'A signed @javy23baez ball should take care of it. #EverybodyIn'

The Cubs tweet was accompanied by a short statement: ‘A signed @javy23baez ball should take care of it. #EverybodyIn’

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Josh Hader cheered by fans in first games since old tweets surfaced

Josh Hader cheered by fans in first games since old tweets surfaced

Milwaukee Brewers fans give pitcher Josh Hader a standing ovation just two days after he apologized for shocking racist and homophobic tweets that resurfaced during the All-Star game

  • Milwaukee Brewers reliever Josh Hader was cheered on by fans on Saturday
  • The warm ovation was Hader’s first appearance on the mound since his years-old racist and homophobic tweets surfaced during the All-Star Game
  • Most of the more than 36,000 fans applauded Hader after he was introduced
  • Hader offered his latest apology Friday for the tweets and spoke to teammates
  • The 24-year-old said the tweets didn’t reflect his values or the person he is now
  • The messages included uses of a slur used to disparage African-Americans and one that simply said ‘KKK’ 
  • MLB announced that Hader would have to participate in diversity and inclusion initiatives in addition to sensitivity training

Dailymail.com Reporter

and
Associated Press

Milwaukee Brewers reliever Josh Hader received a standing ovation from fans Saturday during his first appearance on the mound since his years-old racist and homophobic tweets surfaced during the All-Star Game.

The left-hander jogged in from the bullpen after the Brewers scored three runs in the bottom of the sixth to take a 4-2 lead over the Los Angeles Dodgers.  

Most of the more than 36,000 fans attending in attendance were applauding after he was introduced, with many fans standing at Miller Park. 

Hader offered his latest apology Friday for the years-old tweets. He spoke to teammates earlier Friday in the clubhouse.

The tweets included uses of a slur used to disparage African-Americans and one that simply said ‘KKK.’ 

Those racist, homophobic social-media messages were thoughtless mistakes he made as a teenager, Hader said. 

He sought to reassure fellow Brewers that the vile words didn’t represent the man he has become, one who has learned – in part because of baseball – to reject the language of bigotry. 

Milwaukee Brewers relief pitcher Josh Hader throws during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Saturday, July 21, 2018, in Milwaukee

Milwaukee Brewers relief pitcher Josh Hader throws during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Saturday, July 21, 2018, in Milwaukee

Milwaukee Brewers relief pitcher Josh Hader throws during the seventh inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Saturday, July 21, 2018, in Milwaukee

Hader signs autographs before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Sunday, July 22, 2018, in Milwaukee

Hader signs autographs before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Sunday, July 22, 2018, in Milwaukee

Hader signs autographs before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Sunday, July 22, 2018, in Milwaukee

Fans showed their support for Hader this weekend despite the old racist and homophobic tweets that surfaced when he was a teen

Fans showed their support for Hader this weekend despite the old racist and homophobic tweets that surfaced when he was a teen

Fans showed their support for Hader this weekend despite the old racist and homophobic tweets that surfaced when he was a teen

His teammates had his back on Friday. 

Fellow All-Stars Jesus Aguilar of Venezuela and Lorenzo Cain, who is African-American, were among those who stood directly behind Hader during a news conference about 90 minutes before the Brewers returned from the break by hosting the Los Angeles Dodgers.

‘It’s amazing. It tells me that they have my back and that we are a true family,’ Hader said about the show of solidarity. 

Outfielder Brett Phillips said the reliever offered a sincere apology. Manager Craig Counsell described Hader as emotional and remorseful.

‘I just want them to know that I’m sorry for what I did back in the day and the mistakes that I made,’ Hader said, ‘and that they are a family to me and that they (the tweets) aren’t me and what I meant.’

The 24-year-old Hader also apologized and took responsibility for the tweets after the All-Star Game, saying they did not reflect his values or the person he is now. 

Hader said: ‘They were never my beliefs. I was young. I was saying stuff out of just ignorance and that’s just not what I meant.’  

Hader had posted a slew of homophobic and racist tweets that re-surfaced last week

Hader had posted a slew of homophobic and racist tweets that re-surfaced last week

Hader had posted a slew of homophobic and racist tweets that re-surfaced last week

Until last Tuesday, Hader was best known as the hard-throwing left-hander in the Brewers’ strong bullpen. He has been a lights-out reliever since coming up to the majors in June 2017.

Hader’s 6-foot-3 frame, long hair and glasses gave him a unique look on the mound. A filthy fastball and knee-buckling slider allowed Hader to strike out 89 in just 48 innings.

Several of Hader’s tweets from 2011 and 2012 were unearthed Tuesday while he was pitching in the All-Star Game. Hader learned of the situation when he left the game.

MLB announced Wednesday that the commissioner’s office would require Hader to participate in diversity and inclusion initiatives in addition to sensitivity training.

A day filled with acts of contrition by Hader also included a meeting with Billy Bean, MLB’s vice president for social responsibility and inclusion. He described Hader as ‘punishing himself more than probably anyone else could.’

‘I was really convinced after a couple hours together today – much longer than we expected – that his experience as an athlete and a professional in an integrated, diverse environment has created the person that he is today,’ Bean said.

Milwaukee Brewers manager Craig Counsell answers questions about relief pitcher Josh Hader before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Friday, July 20, 2018, in Milwaukee

Milwaukee Brewers manager Craig Counsell answers questions about relief pitcher Josh Hader before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Friday, July 20, 2018, in Milwaukee

Milwaukee Brewers manager Craig Counsell answers questions about relief pitcher Josh Hader before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Friday, July 20, 2018, in Milwaukee

 Counsell is seen speaking before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Friday, days after Hader's tweets from 2011 and 2012 were unearthed Tuesday

 Counsell is seen speaking before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Friday, days after Hader's tweets from 2011 and 2012 were unearthed Tuesday

 Counsell is seen speaking before a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers Friday, days after Hader’s tweets from 2011 and 2012 were unearthed Tuesday

‘I believe that, much like many of our millennial youth, he just probably forgot about whatever that moment was in his adolescence,’ Bean added.

The tweets stirred a range of emotions among some players who took part in an optional workout on Thursday that did not include the Brewers’ five All-Star representatives. 

Teammates voiced support while also saying they wanted to hear from Hader.

‘Today was big for him. A sincere apology was needed and he did – you could tell in his voice that he’s very, very sorry,’ said Phillips, Hader’s roommate for the past four years. 

They have lived together since their days in the Astros organization before being traded to the Brewers in 2015.

‘Not once – not once – has he said any of those (things) behind closed doors to myself or to anyone who’s close with him. Looking at those tweets, he’s come a long way,’ Phillips said. 

‘Obviously you can see the growth. If you believe that people can change for the worst, then you believe that they can change for the best.’ 

Hader on Saturday struck out pinch-hitter Logan Forsythe for the first out in the seventh.

He allowed a two-out double to Matt Kemp before getting out of the inning when cleanup hitter Max Muncy lined out to first. 

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Orioles' Chris Davis on pace to finish with the LOWEST qualifying batting average in MLB history

Orioles' Chris Davis on pace to finish with the LOWEST qualifying batting average in MLB history

Orioles’ Chris Davis on pace to finish with the LOWEST qualifying batting average in MLB history two years after re-signing for $161million

  • Currently hitting .157, Davis is in danger of finishing the season with the lowest batting average of anyone to qualify for a batting title
  • Davis has twice led the American League in homers and two years ago signed a seven-year, $161 million contract to stay with the Baltimore Orioles 
  • The current record belongs to Detroit Tigers outfielder Rob Deer, who hit .179 in 1991, and Atlanta Braves second baseman Dan Uggla, who tied that mark in 2013
  • Davis has scored only 16 runs this year, and could break the record for fewest runs scored by a qualifying player set by A’s infielder Mario Guerrero in 1978
  • Davis is also dead last in the American League with a -2.1 Wins Above Replacement mark (WAR), which calculates each player’s individual value
  • The only player to finish the season with a WAR of -4 was former Atlanta Braves infielder Jerry Royster, who hit just .216 in 1977 while committing 28 errors 

Alex Raskin Sports News Editor For Dailymail.com

Three years after leading the American League in home runs and two years since re-signing with the Baltimore Orioles for $161 million, former All-Star Chris Davis is on the verge of entering the record books for one of, if not the worst offensive season in modern baseball history.

Currently hitting .157, Davis is in danger of finishing the season with the lowest batting average of anyone to qualify for a batting title (502 plate appearances for a 162-game season), according toThe Wall Street Journal

Since 1900, when baseball’s modern era began, the lowest qualifying batting average has belonged to former Detroit Tigers outfielder Rob Deer, who hit .179 in 1991, and Dan Uggla, who tied that mark in 2013 with the Atlanta Braves.

Currently hitting .157 on the season, Davis is in danger of finishing with the lowest batting average of anyone to qualify for a batting title (502 plate appearances for a 162-game season)

Currently hitting .157 on the season, Davis is in danger of finishing with the lowest batting average of anyone to qualify for a batting title (502 plate appearances for a 162-game season)

Currently hitting .157 on the season, Davis is in danger of finishing with the lowest batting average of anyone to qualify for a batting title (502 plate appearances for a 162-game season)

First baseman Chris Davis currently ranks fifth in the American League with 106 strikeouts on the season after previously finishing first in that category in 2015 and 2016

First baseman Chris Davis currently ranks fifth in the American League with 106 strikeouts on the season after previously finishing first in that category in 2015 and 2016

First baseman Chris Davis currently ranks fifth in the American League with 106 strikeouts on the season after previously finishing first in that category in 2015 and 2016

Still, Deer finished the 1991 season with a respectable 25 home runs while Uggla went deep 22 times in 2013 after coming off an All-Star season the previous year.

Davis has just nine home runs this season, which is far off his career-best of 53 during his All-Star season of 2013.

But that’s only the start of Davis’s problems.

He’s scored only 16 runs on the season, which means Davis is in danger of breaking the record for fewest runs scored by a qualifying player set by Oakland Athletics shortstop Mario Guerrero in 1978.

Davis currently ranks fifth in the American League with 106 strikeouts on the season after previously finishing first in that category in 2015 and 2016 – both of which were significantly better offensive seasons for the 32-year old.

Davis is also dead last in the American League with a -2.1 Wins Above Replacement mark (WAR), which calculates each player’s individual value. According to this metric, Davis is worth 2.1 wins less than an average Triple-A call-up.

According to the Journal, the only player to ever finish the season with a WAR of -4 was former Atlanta Braves infielder Jerry Royster, who hit just .216 in 1977 while committing 28 errors.

Davis is currently on pace to match Royster’s historically-low WAR. (For comparison, Anaheim’s Mike Trout leads the majors with a WAR of 6.5)

Making matters worse is the fact that the Orioles currently have the worst record in the majors and are unlikely to find a taker for the remaining four years of Davis’s contract, valued at $17 million per season.

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Tampa Bay Rays outfielder smashes groins with first baseman

Tampa Bay Rays outfielder smashes groins with first baseman

  • Carlos Gomez collided with Jake Bauers in Saturday home game versus Mariners
  • Gomez completed the sliding catch of the foul ball despite smash to the groin
  • Neither player left the game despite bruises and both played again on Sunday 

Keith Griffith For Dailymail.com

and
Associated Press

A Tampa Bay Rays outfielder and first baseman have smashed their groins together in a play that is producing cringes among baseball fans nationwide.

Incredibly, Rays right fielder Carlos Gomez completed the sliding foul ball catch for a clutch out in Saturday’s home game against the Seattle Mariners, despite colliding with first baseman Jake Bauers.

The collision produced a sickening thunk sound that could be heard on the televised broadcast. 

Rays right fielder Carlos Gomez (right) completed the sliding foul ball catch for a clutch out in Saturday's home game, despite colliding with first baseman Jake Bauers (left)

Rays right fielder Carlos Gomez (right) completed the sliding foul ball catch for a clutch out in Saturday's home game, despite colliding with first baseman Jake Bauers (left)

Rays right fielder Carlos Gomez (right) completed the sliding foul ball catch for a clutch out in Saturday’s home game, despite colliding with first baseman Jake Bauers (left)

Gomez’s two-out catch of Ryon Healy’s foul ball stranded a Mariners’ runner on first in the top of the seventh, sending the Rays up to bat with a 6-3 lead.  

Gomez and Bauers, both presumably wearing cups, lay stunned for a moment in front of the Rays dugout, but were both able to remain in the game. 

The Rays went on to win 7-3, snapping an eight-game losing streak.

Both players also returned to the field on Sunday looking no worse for the wear. 

Carlos Gomez is seen on Sunday, when he returned to play without serious apparent injury

Carlos Gomez is seen on Sunday, when he returned to play without serious apparent injury

Carlos Gomez is seen on Sunday, when he returned to play without serious apparent injury

“It was very scary,” Tampa Bay manager Kevin Cash said of the collision after the game. 

“They were both really fortunate to be OK. Jake has a little banged-up ribs and Carlos a shin, but what a tremendous play to make the catch.”

Rays rookie Bauers doubled in the first for his first major league hit after starting his career 0 for 8.

 

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Kind-hearted baseball fan uses umbrella to keep the rain off JROTC cadet at Atlanta baseball game

Kind-hearted baseball fan uses umbrella to keep the rain off JROTC cadet at Atlanta baseball game

  • Baseball fan was commended on social media for showing respect to the cadet
  • The cadet, a JROTC member, was standing to attention at Suntrust Park stadium 
  • He was standing over POW-MIA Chair of Honor installed at the baseball stadium 

Danyal Hussain For Mailonline

A baseball fan has been praised after a photo of him covering a cadet with an umbrella was shared online.

The photo was taken at an Atlanta Braves game at the Suntrust Park stadium in Atlanta.

The cadet, a JROTC member, was stood at attention next to the POW-MIA Chair of Honor which was being recognised to mark Memorial Day.

The cadetwas stood at attention next to the POW-MIA Chair of Honor in the pouring rain, prompting the fan to intervene

The cadetwas stood at attention next to the POW-MIA Chair of Honor in the pouring rain, prompting the fan to intervene

The cadetwas stood at attention next to the POW-MIA Chair of Honor in the pouring rain, prompting the fan to intervene

Atlanta Braves fans stopped during the baseball game to recognize the POW-MIA Chair of Honor.

Meanwhile, a JROTC member stood to strict attention next to the chair as rain continued to fall.

The fan, dressed in a red raincoat, intervened and held an umbrella over the cadet to shield him from the rain.

The POW-MIA Chair was unveiled by the Braves last year to remember the servicemen and women who remain unaccounted for since World War I.

The fan shielded the cadetwith his umbrella, earning widespread praise on social media for his actions

The fan shielded the cadetwith his umbrella, earning widespread praise on social media for his actions

The fan shielded the cadetwith his umbrella, earning widespread praise on social media for his actions

The image quickly spread on social media after the Atlanta Braves posted it on Twitter with a one-word caption, ‘Respect.’

Another fan captured the moment and praised the man. The fan wrote: ‘They sacrifice so much for us, we can sacrifice for them too!!! #RespectOurMilitary

Several fans shared photos of the moment, paying tribute to the man and cadet.

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