Full schedule for Kentucky tripleheader

Full schedule for Kentucky tripleheader

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Full schedule for Kentucky tripleheader

The Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, the NASCAR Xfinity Series and the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series will be in action for a national series tripleheader at Kentucky Speedway. Check out the full schedule below, subject to change. Note: All times are ET. Thursday, July 12 9:05-9:55 a.m.: NASCAR Camping World Truck Series practice, No …

The Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series, the NASCAR Xfinity Series and the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series will be in action for a national series tripleheader at Kentucky Speedway. Check out the full schedule below, subject to change.

Note: All times are ET.

Thursday, July 12
9:05-9:55 a.m.: NASCAR Camping World Truck Series practice, No TV
11:05-11:55 a.m.: NASCAR Camping World Truck Series final practice, No TV
4:05-4:50 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series practice, NBC Sports App only
5:10 p.m.: NASCAR Camping World Truck Series qualifying, FS1
6:05-6:50 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity final practice, NBC Sports App only
7:30 p.m.: NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Buckle Up in Your Truck 225 (150 laps, 225 miles), FS1

PRESS PASS (Watch live)
9:45 p.m.: Post-NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race

Friday, July 13
12-12:50 p.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series practice, NBCSN
2-2:50 p.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series final practice, NBCSN
5:05 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series qualifying, NBCSN
6:40 p.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Busch Pole Qualifying, NBCSN
8 p.m.: NASCAR Xfinity Series Alsco 300 (200 laps, 300 miles), NBCSN

PRESS PASS (Watch live)
7:40 p.m.: Post-Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series qualifying
10:30 p.m.: Post-NASCAR Xfinity Series race

Saturday, July 14
7:30 p.m.: Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Quaker State 400 presented by Walmart (267 laps, 400.5 miles), NBCSN

PRESS PASS (Watch live)
10:30 p.m.: Post-Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series race

NASCAR addresses yellow line rule in Cup drivers meeting

NASCAR addresses yellow line rule in Cup drivers meeting

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. – NASCAR responded to a question in the drivers meeting before Saturday night’s race about the double yellow line rule.

Justin Haley appeared to have won Friday night’s Xfinity race with a pass just before the finish line, but NASCAR ruled that the left side of Haley’s tires went below both yellow lines that separate the apron from the racing surface. NASCAR declared Kyle Larson the winner and put Haley 18th, the last car on the lead lap.

A rules video played in the drivers meeting stated: “Drivers, this is your warning. Race above the yellow line. If in NASCAR’s judgment you go below the yellow line to improve your position, you will be black-flagged. If, in NASCAR’s judgment, you force someone below to yellow line to prevent them passing you, you may be black-flagged.”

Ryan Newman was the lone driver to ask a question about the yellow line rule. He sought clarification on the rule and about a car’s position on the track, noting that Haley appeared to be ahead when his tires dipped below the yellow lines coming to the checkered flag.

Richard Buck, managing director of the Monster Energy Cup Series, responded to Newman’s query:

“It’s very clear on the video of going below the yellow to advance your position. That’s at any time.

“What is considered going below the double yellow lines? It’s your left-side, the inside of your left-side tires, when they go below the inside line, that’s when we get involved.”

The Cup Rule Book addresses the rule on the double yellow lines in section 10.8.3. It states:

10.8.3 SUPERSPEEDWAY EVENTS/ADDITIONAL IN-RACE VIOLATIONS

.a  Vehicles must race above the double yellow lines around the entire race track. If in NASCAR’s judgement, the vehicle(s) goes beneath the double yellow lines to improve its position, vehicle(s) will be black-flagged. If in NASCAR’s judgement a vehicle forces another vehicle beneath the double yellow lines (in an effort to stop the advancement/pass) the vehicle may be black-flagged.

.b  NASCAR defines beneath the double yellow lines as follows: when the vehicle’s left side tires are beneath the left line of the inside double yellow lines that separates the apron from the racing surface while passing another vehicle.

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JR Motorsports video pokes fun at Dale Jr.'s first broadcasting catchphrase

JR Motorsports video pokes fun at Dale Jr.'s first broadcasting catchphrase

Michelle R. Martinelli Published 1:29 p.m. ET July 6, 2018

During Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s first NASCAR race broadcast as an official member of NBC Sports’ crew, he struggled to contain his excitement at times. And on the last lap as eventual winner Kyle Busch and Kyle Larson battled for the win, Junior let it all out.

As Larson dove to the bottom of the track to try and pass Busch, Earnhardt yelled: “Slide job! Slide job!!!”

It’s still very early in his broadcasting career, but somehow, he already has a catchphrase after a single race. NASCAR fans love it, and Earnhardt’s own second-tier XFINITY Series racing team had some fun with it.

JR Motorsports compiled moments in other sports – including the time Earnhardt and Brad Keselowski had a foot race to a port-a-potty mid-race – and looped the boss man’s “Slide job!” exclamation over it.

Other people even put together their own versions of it too.

On Earnhardt’s podcast this week, he addressed the phrase and how he said it trying to provoke a fellow broadcaster to say it too.

The NASCAR Cup Series next race – and Dale Jr.’s second of the season – is Saturday’s Coke Zero Sugar 400 at Daytona International Speedway.

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Read or Share this story: https://ftw.usatoday.com/2018/07/dale-earnhardt-jr-nascar-broadcast-catchphrase-slide-job-video-funny-other-sports

NASCAR's 'young guns' fire back after track exec blames them for sport's struggles

NASCAR's 'young guns' fire back after track exec blames them for sport's struggles

NASCAR is declining in a variety of ways, including in race attendance.

International Speedway Corporation — which owns 12 of the tracks on the NASCAR Cup Series’ 36-race schedule, including Daytona International Speedway — had “a 10 percent dip in attendance this season for the six races held on its properties from March through May,” the Associated Press reported. And company president John Saunders blamed NASCAR’s “young guns”, as they’ve been dubbed.

Via the AP:

“We still have an issue with star power, and hopefully this stable of young drivers coming along will start to win and build their brands,” Saunders said Thursday.

It’s true the younger drivers have been nearly shut out from Victory Lane this season. The average race winner’s age is about 36, and there have only been six different winners through 17 races.

It’s not surprising some took offense to these comments, but it’s not as if they’re the sole reason people aren’t paying for or watching NASCAR like they used to. Broadcasting the first half of the Cup Series season, FOX and FS1’s viewership was down 23 percent from last year, the AP reported.

Going into the 2018 season, NASCAR promoted its “young guns” in response to recently retired big-name drivers like Dale Earnhardt Jr., Danica Patrick, Jeff Gordon, Tony Stewart and Carl Edwards. And with veterans dominating this season, the younger drivers are tired of being asked when they’re going to win and blamed for the sport’s decline.

As 24-year-old Ryan Blaney said Thursday at his press conference:

“Honestly, this whole ‘young guys need to win now’ thing is getting old. We’re trying. We’re trying our hardest. It’s not like I go out there, and I’m happy for fifth every single week. Any other guy under the age of 25, I’ll just say is the same way. It’s not a competition here between young guys and old guys, it’s a competition between 39 other cars and yourself. …

“It would be healthy for the sport if we just see more variation in winners in general. There have been six winners this year. Come on now. You can’t just put that on the young guys for not winning.”

That’s a fair point. Kevin Harvick, 42, and Kyle Busch, 33, are in control with five wins apiece, while 38-year-old Martin Truex Jr. has three.

Harvick and Busch (Matt Sullivan/Getty Images)

But what about seven-time Cup Series champ Jimmie Johnson? Or 2012 champion Brad Keselowski and perennial contender Denny Hamlin? They’re all winless too.

Rookie Darrell “Bubba” Wallace Jr. said tracks are “boring” and outdated for fans. The 24-year-old added:

“There are a lot of guys that are not young, that have the gray hair, that have not won yet. It’s not all on us.”

Even first-time Daytona 500 winner Austin Dillon, who’s 28, responded to Saunders’ finger pointing by saying he doesn’t know how younger drivers and their teams are supposed to respond to the veterans’ dominance:

“I don’t think it bothers me that he said that. I just want to know what we do about it, do you know what I mean? How do you move forward with that? Because the guys that are in the sport are talented enough to win. …

“Each and every week, you probably can guess who the top three guys are probably going to be. I bet if everybody had to bet their house on it they’d probably pick between three guys right now. Maybe four.”

NASCAR’s next race and the halfway point in the season is Saturday’s Coke Zero Sugar 400 at 7 p.m. ET at Daytona International Speedway.

Kyle Busch opens up on crying-eyes motion after Chicagoland

Kyle Busch opens up on crying-eyes motion after Chicagoland

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Kyle Busch opens up on crying-eyes motion after Chicagoland

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Kyle Busch and the rest of the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series field turned their attention to the next race on the schedule upon arrival Thursday at Daytona International Speedway. But the memory of Busch’s breathtaking final-lap victory last weekend at Chicagoland Speedway still remains fresh — both because of the …

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Kyle Busch and the rest of the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series field turned their attention to the next race on the schedule upon arrival Thursday at Daytona International Speedway. But the memory of Busch’s breathtaking final-lap victory last weekend at Chicagoland Speedway still remains fresh — both because of the nature of it and the social-media buzz surrounding it.

RELATED: Larson contemplates do-overs | Full schedule for Daytona

Then there’s the matter of Busch’s meme-friendly message to the Chicagoland boo-birds after his retaliatory roughing-up of runner-up Kyle Larson, adding a Buschian flair to his post-burnout interview by pantomiming the wiping away of tears to the camera. Thursday at Daytona, Busch explained the impetus for the gesture.

“Well, when you put on a great show and you have a really fun time being able to race these cars and you do everything as hard as you can to try to win a Cup Series race and for as hard as they are to win, even though we’re talking about winning 48 of them, it would certainly be nice to have some appreciation for putting on a good show for those fans,” Busch said Thursday evening at Toyota’s introduction of the 2019 Supra for NASCAR Xfinity Series competition.

“And when the boos are raining down on you in that moment, it certainly doesn’t make you feel good about yourself or what’s going on or what you’re doing or what you just did, and so you sometimes aren’t thinking straight or clearly in those moments and you do what you do. You know, I wouldn’t say that that race was fun to win afterwards, but it’s a win that’s now in the history books.”

Busch indicated that part of the negative reaction to the last-lap battle was that observers failed to take the final circuit in the proper context, weighing his actions against Larson’s contact that initiated the gloves-off contest for the checkered flag. But there’s also Busch’s reputation as one of the sport’s biggest lightning rods, a touchpoint for strong reactions from the grandstands.

There was a significant reaction Thursday from NASCAR legend Donnie Allison, who raved about the Chicagoland finish in a passing visit to the Daytona media center.

“That’s pretty cool,” Busch said. “All the racers out there, all the people that know racing appreciated what that race was. … Well, they take that little tidbit of (Turns) 3 and 4 and don’t even look at 1 and 2, and it’s like, they don’t see the eye-for-an-eye-type thing. You’ve got to know what you’re watching to appreciate it sometimes.”

Revival of the fittest: Toyota Supra coming to NASCAR Xfinity Series

Revival of the fittest: Toyota Supra coming to NASCAR Xfinity Series

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Revival of the fittest: Toyota Supra coming to NASCAR Xfinity Series

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Toyota plans to bring the iconic Supra nameplate back in a big way in 2019, announcing Thursday that the model will compete in the NASCAR Xfinity Series starting next season. Toyota unveiled the dynamic race car prototype Thursday night in the Toyota Injector at Daytona International Speedway, where it will debut …

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Toyota plans to bring the iconic Supra nameplate back in a big way in 2019, announcing Thursday that the model will compete in the NASCAR Xfinity Series starting next season.

Toyota unveiled the dynamic race car prototype Thursday night in the Toyota Injector at Daytona International Speedway, where it will debut in the Xfinity season opener next February. The road-going Supra will hit showrooms starting with the 2019 model year, returning to production for the first time in 17 years.

The Supra replaces the venerable Camry, which will continue as the automaker’s vehicle of choice in the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series. Supra will soon go head-to-head against its performance-car brethren in Chevrolet’s Camaro SS and Ford’s Mustang.

“When you talk Toyota and cool cars, Supra is the first thing that comes to mind for many auto enthusiasts,” Ed Laukes, Toyota Division Marketing’s group vice president, said in a statement. “Supra‘s return in production form is huge news, but now we‘re also going to see this iconic sports car return to American motorsport.

“From a marketing perspective, it‘s important to have a race car that evokes the dynamism and character of its showroom counterpart. We‘re confident we‘ve accomplished that with Supra, and we hope racing fans the world over will proudly cheer its success on track.”

A sports-car version of the new Supra debuted at the Geneva Motor Show in March. The NASCAR rendition is built with design help from Calty Design Research — a longtime Toyota design studio — to conform to stock-car specifications. A distinctive, swoopy nose helps give the car its identity.

The Xfinity Supra marks the sixth race car produced by Toyota Racing Development in collaboration with Calty in the last six years. The manufacturer indicated in a news release that the two groups began work on the NASCAR Supra project last year.

“When Ed (Laukes) told me they were bringing Supra back, I almost didn‘t believe him,” said Kyle Busch, who has competed in Toyotas for Joe Gibbs Racing since 2008. “I figured he was messing with me, but Toyota did it and this is a big deal for the NASCAR Xfinity Series. Supra is an iconic cool car, and to have it racing in NASCAR to highlight Supra‘s return speaks to how important this is. I‘m hoping to be the first guy to get Supra to Victory Lane, but I‘m sure there‘s a few other Toyota drivers thinking the same thing.”

This story will be updated.