MLB's swing and miss against domestic violence

MLB's swing and miss against domestic violence

Cassidy Brandt

Cassidy Brandt

By Abby Weber, Columnist

When Addison Russell began playing for the Chicago Cubs in 2015, he quickly won over the hearts of northsiders everywhere. Sporting the same first name as the street Wrigley Field resides on, Addison Russell joined the Cubs as a 21-year-old phenom whose on-field ability kept him in the spotlight for the coming years.

Beginning his career as the youngest active player at the time, Addison Russell became a symbol of hope to young Americans with dreams of baseball. He was a crucial member of the Cubs’ 2016 World Series-winning team and was named an All-Star that year.

In June 2017 and again in September 2018, news of domestic violence allegations against Russell circulated, sending shockwaves to disbelieving fans everywhere. Many people continued their support of Russell throughout the rest of the 2017 and 2018 seasons despite these allegations. This is a direct reflection of MLB’s poor handling of the situation.

As a society, it is clear we are struggling to take domestic violence accusations seriously. If large corporations with a substantial media presence like MLB do not take appropriate actions against those accused, then the public’s attitude will reflect this, perpetuating the problem.

MLB instituted a domestic violence policy in 2015 to acknowledge the ongoing abuse problems the sport witnessed. Nowhere within the policy is any kind of explicit disciplinary action stated. MLB’s disciplinary policy directly states “the Commissioner will decide on appropriate discipline, with no minimum or maximum penalty under the policy. Players may challenge such decisions to the arbitration panel.” Though this policy may seem outwardly progressive, it is ineffective and essentially useless in disciplining players and educating the public.

The first time MLB referred to this policy was in October 2015,  just two months after the policy was enacted. Jose Reyes, then a Colorado Rockies player, was arrested for throwing his wife into a glass door.  In a 2016 Sports Illustrated article, it was reported that Reyes was suspended without pay for about a month and a half, losing about $7 million.

Since this suspension, Jose Reyes continued to play MLB with the New York Mets with a $2 million dollar salary, crossed the 500-career-stolen-bases mark and participated in playoff games. Essentially, once MLB acknowledges the incident enough to appease public outcry, incidents like these are forgotten and these players continue making millions of dollars while America looks up to them.

A perfect example of the toxic attitude this policy creates is this statement from the Yankees’ owner regarding another notorious domestic-violence perpetrator, Aroldis Chapman: “He paid the penalty. Sooner or later, we forget, right? That’s the way we’re supposed to be in life. He did everything right and said everything right when he was with us.”

If MLB does not amend its policy to create harsher punishments, such as termination, domestic violence within baseball will continue and ambivalent attitudes toward domestic violence in the United States will continue to persist as well.

Abby is a sophomore in LAS.

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Osuna makes 1st appearance for Astros following domestic violence suspension

Osuna makes 1st appearance for Astros following domestic violence suspension

Roberto Osuna made his first appearance with the Houston Astros on Monday following the recent completion of his 75-game suspension for violating MLB’s domestic violence policy.

He was dealt to the defending World Series champions on July 30 after being out since he was arrested and charged with assaulting his girlfriend May 8 in Toronto.

He is due in court Sept. 5. and is expected to plead not guilty.

The former All-Star was inserted into the game in the bottom of the eighth inning in San Francisco, though the Astros’ official Twitter account made no mention of their controversial acquisition’s debut at that juncture.

Osuna was excellent on Monday night, however, requiring just five pitches — all strikes — to get out of his one frame of work. In fact, he even got the win thanks to a Marwin Gonzalez homer that lifted the Astros to a 3-1 win over the Giants.

“Especially like being in such a great team with great teammates, it’s easy to forget about the stuff that’s going on off the field, and being able to play and help the team win is unbelievable,” Osuna said postgame.

“I really like my teammates. They’ve been treating me with a lot of respect, and I’m really comfortable.”

It was Osuna’s first MLB action since May 6, and it was accompanied by some boos from the San Francisco .

“It was a quick look obviously with five pitches,” Astros manager A.J. Hinch said. “He’s got a good arm. First game back is always important, it’s the next step for him to get incorporated into our games, coming away with the win. A good first impression on the field.”

Contributing: A.J. Perez and Josh Peter, and Associated Press

© 2018 USATODAY.COM

Astros brass huddles to discuss Osuna's pending arrival

Astros brass huddles to discuss Osuna's pending arrival

FILE – In this April 10, 2018, file photo, Toronto Blue Jays relief pitcher Roberto Osuna throws to a Baltimore Orioles batter during a baseball game in Baltimore. Houston Astros manager A.J. Hinch has met privately with the teams owner and general manager ahead of Osuna being activated following a 75-game suspension for violating Major League Baseballs domestic violence policy. Hinch says Osuna will join the Astros in Los Angeles on Sunday, Aug. 5, and be activated for the series finale against the Dodgers. The Astros acquired the right-handed reliever from the Blue Jays at the trade deadline this week. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Astros manager A.J. Hinch has met privately with the team’s owner and general manager ahead of reliever Roberto Osuna being activated following a 75-game suspension for violating Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy.

Hinch says Osuna will join the Astros in Los Angeles on Sunday and be activated for the series finale against the Dodgers.

Hinch met with owner Jim Crane and GM Jeff Luhnow to discuss the matter on Saturday at Dodger Stadium, but declined to go into details. He says he plans to meet with Osuna on Sunday to get to know him and his background.

The Astros acquired the right-handed reliever from the Blue Jays at the trade deadline this week. The move raised eyebrows since Houston had previously stated its no-tolerance policy regarding domestic violence.

Osuna was arrested in May and charged with assaulting his girlfriend.