Can you name the 2018 Detroit Tigers?

Can you name the 2018 Detroit Tigers?

Hey guys! I’m Ethan, from Athletics Nation. I started this project in 2016 where I tried to name everyone who played for each team around the league.

Before you forget some of the names of the more obscure members of this year’s team, you should try to name everyone who played in a game for the Tigers this season! I’ll be posting these once per day, Monday through Friday. I’ll be going in order of record from worst to best, and if necessary, I’ll wait for teams to get eliminated in the event that anyone pulls a Mark Kiger and makes his debut in the postseason.

Check back each day to see the updated list here!

If you want to play last year’s roster quizzes, you can do that too. Heck, if you really have tons of time to kill, here’s the 2016 list.

Entering last names is all you need. I included nicknames as acceptable answers for a couple of players.

This is a FanPost and does not necessarily reflect the views of the <em>Bless You Boys</em> writing staff.

Ron Gardenhire wants Tigers to seek more Comerica Park-friendly players

Ron Gardenhire wants Tigers to seek more Comerica Park-friendly players

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Bob Wojnowski, Lynn Henning and Chris McCosky wrap up the season for the 2018 Detroit Tigers. The Detroit News, The Detroit News

Detroit — It certainly had its moments, and it was a heck of a lot of fun during that run of four straight Central Division titles. But, truth be told, it never really made a lot of sense. It was incongruous, somehow.

The Detroit Tigers, a team built to slug, playing 81 games a year in one of the most slugger-proof stadiums in the league. It was illogical. And even though the likes of Miguel Cabrera, Victor Martinez, J.D. Martinez, and Prince Fielder could at times make the park seem small, it proved unsustainable.

The Tigers never hit 200 home runs in a season through that run (2011-2014), they never led the American League, let alone the major leagues, in home runs. The best they finished in the majors was tied for seventh, in 2013 and 2014.

And, oh by the way, for all the money they spent on sluggers, they never won a World Series championship. When the home runs weren’t flying, the Tigers often struggled to score. They weren’t built for manufacturing runs.

“This is a big ballpark,” Tigers manager Ron Gardenhire said. “It’s not conducive to home runs, unless you are a really big shooter. But there is a lot of room out there for doubles and triples. A single up the middle can turn into a double if you are running out of the box.”

More: Adeiny Hechavarria could be best option for Tigers at shortstop

Gardenhire loved bringing in his Minnesota Twins teams into spacious Comerica Park. His lineup featured a bunch of aggressive hitters more than willing to take an extra base on a single up the middle — Denard Span, Carlos Gomez, Nick Punto, Alexi Casilla, Jason Kubel, Jason Bartlett, even Torii Hunter and Michael Cuddyer.

“The teams I had there had to play like that,” Gardenhire said. “When I came here with the Twins, we liked hitting here because it played more to our team. Speed is a factor in this ballpark. I am not saying you don’t like power, but speed can play here.

“It’s a thought process I am going to keep in mind here when we are talking about players we are looking at.”

Gardenhire inherited a Tigers team this year with very little speed, no prototypical lead-off hitter and, once Cabrera was lost to injury, no real power. He was shocked to see teams shifting on non-power threats like Dixon Machado, James McCann and Jose Iglesias.

He saw Leonys Martin, Machado and McCann all have their offensive production severely hampered by trying to increase the launch angle on their swings in a misbegotten attempt to hit more home runs.

He’s not asking the Tigers to change their DNA, just maybe incorporate some small ball into their curriculum.

“When you are looking at a baseball player, you ask yourself, how can he help your team at the major-league level when you are drafting a guy,” Gardenhire said. “I like that speed game. I think it’s a fun game to watch.”

JaCoby Jones, Niko Goodrum, Victor Reyes and Mikie Mahtook fit the style of play Gardenhire wants to be able to play at Comerica Park — though all four had inconsistent offensive seasons. Jones, truth be told, has the ideal skill-set Gardenhire is looking for — speed, great athletic instincts both in the field and on the bases.

But, as general manager Al Avila forthrightly pointed out, the club can’t abide their everyday center fielder hitting .207 and striking out 30 percent of his plate appearances.

“We really like JaCoby Jones and his defense and his base running,” Avila said. “He’s an exciting player. But you can’t have a lineup full of .200 hitters, which is what we have right now. And believe me, everybody in that clubhouse knows you can’t win with a lineup full of .200 hitters.”

Both Avila and Gardenhire recognize that if Jones can figure it out at the plate, it would greatly hasten the club’s rebuilding process.

“We have to be careful and not fall in love with every player, because we have to make some tough decisions,” Avila said. “Now, in saying that, we do like him. He’s still young, he’s still under control, and there’s still an opportunity for him to get better.

“There are certain things that he struggles with, either plate discipline or pitch recognition, and we’re determined to get him better. We’re determined to get it out of him and we still have a little time to find out if he can do it. I’m hoping that he does, because if he does then really, it saves us a lot of headaches.”

Gradually, too, the Tigers recently have started to stock their farm system with more speedy, athletic, Comerica Park-friendly players. Outfielders Jacob Robson (Triple A last season), Cam Gibson (Double A), Troy Montgomery (Double A) and Danny Woodrow (Double A) certainly fit that mold.

Also in that mold are infielders Willi Castro and Sergio Alcantara and, still in the lower levels, Jose King.

Slowly but surely, the thought process is changing.

“I know everybody talks power and everybody is looking for power,” Gardenhire said. “And I am not saying we’re going to draft these speed guys when there is a home-run hitter there who has a chance to be a 40-home run hitter.

“But speed does play, too. That should be part of our process, too.”

[email protected]

Twitter: @cmccosky

Adeiny Hechavarria could be best option for Tigers at shortstop

Adeiny Hechavarria could be best option for Tigers at shortstop

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Bob Wojnowski, Lynn Henning and Chris McCosky wrap up the season for the 2018 Detroit Tigers. The Detroit News, The Detroit News

Those studying the Tigers 2019 roster will note a couple of Florida-style sinkholes that have ripped open the past couple of weeks.

There is no starting shortstop. Nor is there a starting second baseman the team would prefer to anoint well ahead of 2019 spring camp.

Various names could be tied to Detroit once the World Series has ended and baseball’s offseason shopping mart formally opens doors.

Adeiny Hechavarria and Jordy Mercer make sense as the Tigers consider dual position answers. Never mind that neither is ideal, nor will either gent please fans who want Tigers general manager Al Avila to acquire roster help a good deal sturdier than the team can probably attract.

Asdrubal Cabrera, Alcides Escobar, and, in an overly broad discussion, Logan Forsythe and Daniel Murphy, could conceivably be talked about, given that the Tigers happen also to be mulling help at designated hitter and first base.

Up-the-middle talent is needed now that Jose Iglesias has departed for free agency and the Tigers hunt for a replacement who doesn’t look as if he’ll be a re-signed Iglesias.

Meanwhile, with the team preferring to use Niko Goodrum as an all-purpose super-sub, and with Dawel Lugo demonstrating that he needs time, perhaps a lot of it, at Triple A, the Tigers would welcome a safe, inexpensive, short-term answer at second base.

More: Tigers prospects getting tougher tutoring in Florida

Or the option might be to sign one player who can play either spot and then trust the 2019 roster’s diversity to fill in based on that day’s lineup needs.

“We have to look at the whole picture,” said Avila, which was his way of saying much remains fluid in terms of player availability, signing requirements, and ultimate strategies about those middle-infield vacancies.

What is known is the Tigers will focus most directly on shortstop. The position is an infield’s hub and nerve center. It is either a pitcher’s best friend, or, if glovework isn’t up to code, it’s a pitcher’s and team’s daily defensive challenge.

The Tigers for five years could trust Iglesias’ steady hands and throws. They won’t be interested in compromising when a new shortstop arrives.

Second base offers a bit more wiggle room. Defense is important there, as well, but the Tigers have Goodrum as at least an acceptable part-time option. One guess is Avila and his lieutenants will sign a player who can handle either position and then count on various roster handymen to offer plug-in help for manager Ron Gardenhire.

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Guidelines will be followed as the Tigers begin shopping:

►It’s all but certain Avila will be interested in offering only a one-year contract. Rookies (Willi Castro, Kody Clemens, perhaps Sergio Alcantara, possibly Isaac Paredes) are scheduled for arrival in 2020 and the Tigers aren’t interested in adding expensive carryover luggage past next season.

►There are few trade routes available. It’s possible the Tigers could make an inexpensive deal for short-term help, but it’s not as likely as signing relatively inexpensive people who can get them through 2019.

That leaves a handful of prime candidates who could ease Avila’s infield anxiety. Among possible, if not probable, names:

Hechavarria, 29, Yankees: He is a free agent with a standout skill of particular appeal to the Tigers: He can pick it at shortstop. Granted, he is not much of a stick, which is why he already has played for five big-league teams. But he beats by a mile the offense Detroit would get from another slick-fielding shortstop employed the Tigers in 2018: Pete Kozma.

Consider his numbers since 2015 in Defensive Runs Saved, and Ultimate Zone Rating based on 150 games.

Iglesias, for example, has a startlingly low DRS of net-five during those four seasons, based on Fangraphs calculations. Hechavarria during the same stretch is plus-23 DRS, even as he has played fewer than 100 games each of the past two seasons.

Iglesias’ UZR/150 during those four years: 2.9, 12.2, 10.2, and 9.7. Hechavarria counters with 12.0, 7.0, 9.0, and 4.3.  

Hechavarria and his reps no doubt will want a multi-year deal. The Tigers will prefer to offer a single season, although these things have a way of working out when a player’s career offensive numbers are a .254 batting average and .635 OPS, with 28 home runs in seven big-league seasons.

Fans, again, will want someone with a bigger bat. But the Tigers understand this is a short-term, defense-first decision. Hechavarria could be their most practical answer.

Cabrera, 33 (Nov. 13), Phillies: Cabrera is a switch-hitter who would excite Comerica’s customers who like hitting and recognizable names. Playing the past season for the Phillies and Mets, he had 23 homers, a .262 batting average, .774 OPS, and a WAR of 0.7.

He is a free agent who can also play second base. And he plays second base about as badly these days as he plays shortstop. He is a negative on DRS and has negative UZR/50 numbers at either position.

The Tigers during their reincarnation are emphasizing defense and, at least ostensibly, proper baseball protocol. Cabrera isn’t a player who measures up in ways Gardenhire, to name one man in charge, would appreciate.

Mercer, 32, Pirates: Mercer is not a bad shortstop. And he carries almost a .700 career OPS, with capacity to hit an occasional home run. He also has played second base during his seven-year, big-league career. His issue, like Cabrera’s, is primarily defense: negative numbers in 2018 on DRS and on UZR/50. The Tigers likely aren’t biting.

Escobar, 32 (Dec. 16), Royals: Same story here as with Cabrera and Mercer. He has problems in the field, not to mention at the plate, which is how you end up with a minus-0.7 WAR for 2018. The Tigers will pass, thank you.

There will be similar considerations, of course, at second base, but for the Tigers any second baseman considered probably needs to double as a shortstop.

That excludes Forsythe, not that Forsythe didn’t exclude Forsythe with a horrible 2018 season. He is a free agent and second baseman with some past quality numbers that for whatever reason didn’t transfer to the Dodgers and Twins in 2018. There will be no interest in this free agent, at least in Detroit.

Murphy? Now you’re talking. Except …

Murphy is a hitter more than a fielder, and while you can use him at first base or in the outfield, or of course as a DH, all of which would entice Detroit, second base would be his preferred position at Comerica. That simply isn’t happening, for various reasons, beginning with the reality Murphy can hit and will want to tag on almost certainly with a true contender in 2019, which doesn’t figure to be Detroit.

That leaves the front office to meet this week in Lakeland, Fla., for its annual October organizational meetings. The group will kick around names and potential targets as the Tigers prepare to add players and remedies ahead of 2019.

And, at their most private moments, it is reasonable to wonder if some of those players to be pursued leave them not a lot more excited about possibilities than fans who would just as soon get started, now, with 2020.

[email protected]

Twitter: @Lynn_Henning

Tigers' JaCoby Jones: Starting in regular season finale

Tigers&#039; JaCoby Jones: Starting in regular season finale

Jones is starting in center field and batting second in Sunday’s game against the Brewers.

This will be Jones’ sixth straight start to end the regular season, as he’s seemingly moved ahead of Victor Reyes in the center field pecking order. However, it’s unclear if the Tigers will turn to Jones as their everyday starter in center heading into 2019. The 26-year-old has a pedestrian .209/.268/.367 slash line this season, and he’s yet to really do anything to distinguish himself at the MLB level.

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Detroit Tigers score vs. Milwaukee Brewers: Time, TV, game info

Detroit Tigers score vs. Milwaukee Brewers: Time, TV, game info

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Detroit Tigers (64-97) vs. Milwaukee Brewers (94-67)

When: 3:10 p.m.

Where: Miller Park, Milwaukee.

TV: Fox Sports Detroit.

Radio: WXYT-FM (97.1; other radio affiliates).

First-pitch weather forecast: Cloudy, 56 degrees, 40 percent chance of rain through afternoon (Miller Park has a retractable roof).

Probable starting pitchers: RHP Spencer Turnbull (0-1, 5.73 ERA) vs. LHP Gio Gonzalez (9-11, 4.34 ERA).

Tigers lineup: To be posted later today.

Game notes: More than just the final game of a rough season for the Tigers. If the Brewers win and the Cubs lose today, Milwaukee will win the NL Central Division.

More: Tigers did stink in 2018, but here’s how they were successful

Twitter updates

Live updates for mobile users.

Detroit Tigers lineup vs. Milwaukee Brewers: Who starts Game 162?

Detroit Tigers lineup vs. Milwaukee Brewers: Who starts Game 162?

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Detroit Tigers (64-97) vs. Milwaukee Brewers (94-67)

When: 3:10 p.m.

Where: Miller Park, Milwaukee.

TV: Fox Sports Detroit.

Radio: WXYT-FM (97.1; other radio affiliates).

First-pitch weather forecast: Cloudy, 56 degrees, 40 percent chance of rain through afternoon (Miller Park has a retractable roof).

Probable starting pitchers: RHP Spencer Turnbull (0-1, 5.73 ERA) vs. LHP Gio Gonzalez (9-11, 4.34 ERA).

Tigers lineup:

3B Jeimer Candelario

CF JaCoby Jones

RF Nicholas Castellanos

1B Niko Goodrum

LF Mikie Mahtook

C James McCann

2B Dawel Lugo

SS Pete Kozma

P Spencer Turnbull

Game notes: More than just the final game of a rough season for the Tigers. If the Brewers win and the Cubs lose today, Milwaukee will win the NL Central Division.

More: Tigers did stink in 2018, but here’s how they were successful

Twitter updates

Live updates for mobile users.