White Sox trail Indians 6-0; game in rain delay in 7th inning

White Sox trail Indians 6-0; game in rain delay in 7th inning

Dylan Covey’s hot streak to open the month of June was a genuinely nice surprise for a White Sox team that has needed them this season.

But on a muggy Monday night in Cleveland, he and the Sox were better described as a hot mess as they fell behind the Indians 6-0. The game was delayed in the bottom of the seventh inning due to rain.

While facing the American League Central leaders for the third time in five starts, Covey allowed five runs – four earned – on six hits with five walks (one intentional), two strikeouts and a hit batter.

His defense didn’t help, committing three errors in the first three innings.

Covey stranded a pair of runners in scoring position after catcher Kevan Smith committed an error on a throw to second base in the first inning. But he didn’t have the same success when the Indians loaded the bases with nobody out in the second.

Lonnie Chisenhall singled and Rajai Davis reached on second baseman Yoan Moncada’s fielding error. Covey and third baseman Yolmer Sanchez botched an attempt to field Jason Kipnis’ bunt single that loaded the bases, and Roberto Perez followed with a two-run, ground-rule double to right field. Francisco Lindor’s sacrifice fly gave the Indians a 3-0 lead.

Covey was saddled with the third error, in the third inning, when his pickoff throw to first bounced by Jose Abreu. Kipnis drove in a run with a single for a 4-0 lead and tacked on another with a solo homer in the fifth.

Heading into Monday, Covey has been one of the Sox’s bright spots after a 2017 season in which he went 0-7 with a 7.71 ERA and battled an oblique injury. Per Rule 5 draft pick rules last season, he was forced to pitch at the major-league level before he was ready. But Sox general manager Rick Hahn said Thursday he came into spring training much farther along than they had anticipated and morphed that preparation into a surprising spring with the Sox.

After he was called up the second time this season, he posted a 1.53 ERA with eight walks and 30 strikeouts in 29 1/3 innings over his last five starts entering Monday.

Sox manager Rick Renteria was asked before the game if Covey had shown enough thus far to believe his success is sustainable and not just a blip. Renteria said he believes Covey’s confidence and focus could help him.

“On the outside looking in, I would say he’s on a path that leads us to believe he’s turning a corner and getting to where you feel comfortable with all of his approaches, when he’s attacking hitters, and that he’s going to be able to have this become a sustainable activity for him,” Renteria said. “The stuff is good. It’s always going to be, for all pitchers, trusting the stuff and commanding strikes.”

But Monday night was among the roughest outings Covey has had this year, and Renteria lifted him heading into the sixth inning after he had thrown 94 pitches, 56 for strikes. Reliever Hector Santiago added on to the sloppy night, issuing a bases-loaded walk in the sixth for a 6-0 Indians lead.

Indians right-hander Trevor Bauer, however, was on point.

He gave up three hits in the first two innings but then only allowed three more Sox baserunners over the next five innings, on two walks and a Yonder Alonso fielding error.

White Sox midseason minors promotions coming, and Eloy Jimenez likely to jump to Triple A »

Matt Davidson’s first homer in a month a highlight as the White Sox get swept by the Tigers »

No longer ‘scared’ to attack the plate, White Sox’s Dylan Covey showing he belongs »

White Sox trail Indians 6-0 as game goes into rain delay in 7th inning

White Sox trail Indians 6-0 as game goes into rain delay in 7th inning

Dylan Covey’s hot streak to open the month of June was a genuinely nice surprise for a White Sox team that has needed them this season.

But on a muggy Monday night in Cleveland, he and the Sox were better described as a hot mess as they fell behind the Indians 6-0.

While facing the American League Central leaders for the third time in five starts, Covey allowed five runs – four earned – on six hits with five walks (one intentional), two strikeouts and a hit batter.

His defense didn’t help, committing three errors in the first three innings.

Covey stranded a pair of runners in scoring position after catcher Kevan Smith committed an error on a throw to second base in the first inning. But he didn’t have the same success when the Indians loaded the bases with nobody out in the second.

Lonnie Chisenhall singled and Rajai Davis reached on second baseman Yoan Moncada’s fielding error. Covey and third baseman Yolmer Sanchez botched an attempt to field Jason Kipnis’ bunt single that loaded the bases, and Roberto Perez followed with a two-run, ground-rule double to right field. Francisco Lindor’s sacrifice fly gave the Indians a 3-0 lead.

Covey was saddled with the third error, in the third inning, when his pickoff throw to first bounced by Jose Abreu. Kipnis drove in a run with a single for a 4-0 lead and tacked on another with a solo homer in the fifth.

Heading into Monday, Covey was one of the Sox’s bright spots after a 2017 season in which he went 0-7 with a 7.71 ERA and battled an oblique injury. Per Rule 5 draft pick rules last season, he was forced to pitch at the major-league level before he was ready. But Sox general manager Rick Hahn said Thursday he came into spring training much farther along than they had anticipated, having worked on his mechanics all offseason, and he morphed that preparation into a solid spring with the Sox.

After he was called up the second time this season, he posted a 1.53 ERA with eight walks and 30 strikeouts in 29 1/3 innings over his last five starts entering Monday.

Sox manager Rick Renteria was asked before the game if Covey had shown enough thus far to believe his success is sustainable and not just a blip. Renteria said he believes Covey’s confidence and focus could help him.

“On the outside looking in, I would say he’s on a path that leads us to believe he’s turning a corner and getting to where you feel comfortable with all of his approaches, when he’s attacking hitters, and that he’s going to be able to have this become a sustainable activity for him,” Renteria said. “The stuff is good. It’s always going to be, for all pitchers, trusting the stuff and commanding strikes.”

But Monday night was among the roughest outings Covey has had this year, and Renteria lifted him heading into the sixth inning after he had thrown 94 pitches, 56 for strikes. Reliever Hector Santiago added on to the sloppy night, issuing a bases-loaded walk in the sixth for a 6-0 Indians lead.

Indians right-hander Trevor Bauer, however, was on point.

He gave up three hits in the first two innings but then only allowed three more Sox baserunners over the next five innings, on two walks and a Yonder Alonso fielding error.

The Sox got a break from the heat and the mess in the bottom of the seventh when a rain storm rolled in and delayed the game for 35 minutes. That ended the night for Bauer, who struck out eight.

Sanchez’s RBI single off reliever Evan Marshall in the eighth put the Sox on the board.

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White Sox midseason minors promotions coming, and Eloy Jimenez likely to jump to Triple A »

Matt Davidson’s first homer in a month a highlight as the White Sox get swept by the Tigers »

No longer ‘scared’ to attack the plate, White Sox’s Dylan Covey showing he belongs »

White Sox, Dylan Covey trail Indians 6-0

White Sox, Dylan Covey trail Indians 6-0

Dylan Covey’s hot streak to open the month of June was a genuine nice surprise for a White Sox team that has needed them this season.

But on a muggy Monday night in Cleveland, he and the Sox were better described as a hot mess as they fell behind the Indians 6-0.

While facing the American League Central leaders for the third time in five starts, Covey allowed five runs – four earned – on six hits with five walks (one intentional), two strikeouts and a hit batter.

His defense didn’t help, committing three errors in the first three innings.

Covey stranded a pair of runners in scoring position after catcher Kevan Smith committed an error on a throw to second base in the first inning. But he didn’t have the same success when the Indians loaded the bases with nobody out in the second.

Lonnie Chisenhall singled and Rajai Davis reached on second baseman Yoan Moncada’s fielding error. Covey and third baseman Yolmer Sanchez botched an attempt to field Jason Kipnis’ bunt single that loaded the bases, and Roberto Perez followed with a two-run, ground-rule double to right field. Francisco Lindor’s sacrifice fly gave the Indians a 3-0 lead.

Covey was saddled with the third error, in the third inning, when his pickoff throw to first bounced by Jose Abreu. Kipnis drove in a run with a single for a 4-0 lead and tacked on another with a solo homer in the fifth.

Heading into Monday, Covey has been one of the Sox’s bright spots after a 2017 season in which he went 0-7 with a 7.71 ERA and battled an oblique injury. Per Rule 5 draft pick rules last season, he was forced to pitch at the major-league level before he was ready. But Sox general manager Rick Hahn said Thursday he came into spring training much farther along than they had anticipated and morphed that preparation into a surprising spring with the Sox.

After he was called up the second time this season, he posted a 1.53 ERA with eight walks and 30 strikeouts in 29 1/3 innings over his last five starts entering Monday.

Sox manager Rick Renteria was asked before the game if Covey had shown enough thus far to believe his success is sustainable and not just a blip. Renteria said he believes Covey’s confidence and focus could help him.

“On the outside looking in, I would say he’s on a path that leads us to believe he’s turning a corner and getting to where you feel comfortable with all of his approaches, when he’s attacking hitters, and that he’s going to be able to have this become a sustainable activity for him,” Renteria said. “The stuff is good. It’s always going to be, for all pitchers, trusting the stuff and commanding strikes.”

But Monday night was among the roughest outings Covey has had this year, and Renteria lifted him heading into the sixth inning after he had thrown 94 pitches, 56 for strikes. Reliever Hector Santiago added on to the sloppy night, issuing a bases-loaded walk in the sixth for a 6-0 Indians lead.

Indians right-hander Trevor Bauer, however, was on point.

He gave up three hits in the first two innings but then only allowed three more Sox baserunners over the next five innings, on two walks and a Yonder Alonso fielding error.

White Sox midseason minors promotions coming, and Eloy Jimenez likely to jump to Triple A »

Matt Davidson’s first homer in a month a highlight as the White Sox get swept by the Tigers »

No longer ‘scared’ to attack the plate, White Sox’s Dylan Covey showing he belongs »

White Sox's Nicky Delmonico: Out of splint

White Sox's Nicky Delmonico: Out of splint

Delmonico (hand) is no longer wearing a split and has begun work to strengthen his wrist, Brian Sandalow of the Chicago Sun-Times reports.

Delmonico had a split on his right hand and wrist area for close to three weeks in order to immobilize a fractured third metacarpal bone in his right hand. When an individual has been wearing a split that long, the muscles begin to atrophy, so there’s a buildup process Delmonico must go through before he can initiate baseball activities. He’ll likely require a rehabilitation stint before eventually returning the active roster.

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Fantasy Baseball: Two-start pitcher rankings for Week 13 identify Domingo German and Dylan Covey as sleepers

Fantasy Baseball: Two-start pitcher rankings for Week 13 identify Domingo German and Dylan Covey as sleepers

More Fantasy Baseball: Week 13 sleeper hitters | Bullpen Report | Waiver Wire

Certainly no shortage of high-end two-start pitchers here in Week 13 (June 18-24). In fact, the number of must-start options goes a dozen deep.

But among them is a pitcher who’s still available in more than half of CBS Sports leagues even though he’s coming off back-to-back quality starts with nine strikeouts or more and has the second-highest swinging-strike rate in baseball.

I’m talking about Domingo German, whose upside has been overshadowed by his 5.23 ERA. I think you pick him up this week and hold on to him forever. I also like Dylan Covey as a sleeper, if only in points leagues. He has the best ground-ball rate in baseball, which gives him a high floor even if the WHIP and strikeouts don’t measure up. It makes him a perfect pitcher to stream in a format that emphasizes volume over efficiency. 

Officially, I consider the top 12 here to be must-starts in Fantasy. Kenta Maeda is a little risky fresh off the DL, but he has big strikeout potential and one especially favorable matchup. The next three — Luke Weaver, Marco Gonzales and Caleb Smith — are also advisable in points leagues, and if I was looking to maximize starts, I might go as far down as Mike Montgomery at 21.

Two-start pitchers for Week 13
Rank Pitcher Start 1 Start 2
1 Chris Sale, BOS at MIN vs. SEA
2 Gerrit Cole, HOU vs. TB vs. KC
3 Trevor Bauer, CLE vs. CHW vs. DET
4 Jacob deGrom, NYM at COL vs. LAD
5 Zack Greinke, ARI at LAA at PIT
6 Mike Clevinger, CLE vs. CHW vs. DET
7 Jose Berrios, MIN vs. BOS vs. TEX
8 Miles Mikolas, STL at PHI at MIL
9 Jameson Taillon, PIT vs. MIL vs. ARI
10 Nick Pivetta, PHI vs. STL at WAS
11 Domingo German, NYY* vs. SEA at TB
12 Kenta Maeda, LAD at CHC at NYM
13 Luke Weaver, STL at PHI at MIL
14 Marco Gonzales, SEA at NYY at BOS
15 Caleb Smith, MIA* at SF at COL
16 Sonny Gray, NYY at WAS at TB
17 Jaime Barria, LAA vs. ARI vs. TOR
18 Carlos Rodon, CHW at CLE vs. OAK
19 Dylan Covey, CHW at CLE vs. OAK
20 Jhoulys Chacin, MIL at PIT vs. STL
21 Mike Montgomery, CHC* vs. LAD at CIN
22 Tyler Anderson, COL vs. NYM vs. MIA
23 Dereck Rodriguez, SF vs. MIA vs. SD
24 Freddy Peralta, MIL at PIT vs. STL
25 Andrew Suarez, SF vs. MIA vs. SD
26 Bartolo Colon, TEX at KC at MIN
27 Eric Lauer, SD vs. OAK at SF
28 German Marquez, COL vs. NYM vs. MIA
29 Tyler Chatwood, CHC vs. LAD at CIN
30 Jason Vargas, NYM at COL vs. LAD
31 Ian Kennedy, KC vs. TEX at HOU
32 Paul Blackburn, OAK at SD at CHW
33 Trevor Williams, PIT vs. MIL vs. ARI
34 Sal Romano, CIN vs. DET vs. CHC
35 David Hess, BAL* at WAS at ATL
36 Jaime Garcia, TOR vs. ATL at LAA
37 Erick Fedde, WAS vs. NYY vs. PHI
38 Wilmer Font, TB* at HOU vs. NYY

*RP-eligible

James Shields, Joakim Soria and some other potential midseason trade candidates for the White Sox

James Shields, Joakim Soria and some other potential midseason trade candidates for the White Sox

The White Sox don’t have as many assets to trade away as last year, but James Shields and a number of relievers could still bring back something of value.

Another day, another quality start for James Shields.

The White Sox once more didn’t win a Shields start. Despite an increasingly good-looking season stat line, Shields can’t seem to rack up many wins, with just two to his name on the season. But of course, wins are not exactly the most important barometer in this rebuilding campaign.

Speaking of the rebuild, the White Sox are getting closer to the trade deadline, it’s about a month and a half away. And Shields’ continued success could have Rick Hahn’s phone ringing as July 31 creeps closer. After six innings and three runs in Sunday’s loss to the visiting Detroit Tigers, Shields has seven quality starts in his last 10 outings,

After last season’s struggles that ended in a 5.23 ERA and 27 home runs surrendered, getting anything for Shields might’ve seemed a bit of a fantasy. But Shields has delivered, especially since the end of a rocky April.

“It’s very important to try to eat as many innings as you possibly can,” Shields said of his consistent efforts of late. “Early on in the season, we were ruining our bullpen by not going deep into games. My main focus is to go as deep as I possibly can. … Consistency’s the name of the game.”

Does it make him one of the most attractive names on the market? No, probably not. Is it going to fetch a highly ranked prospect? No, probably not. But it might fetch something, and in a season where guys believed to be afterthoughts like Dylan Covey and Daniel Palka are working their way into the conversation about the White Sox future, who wouldn’t want something added to this rebuilding effort?

And Shields isn’t the only White Sox player who could bring something back.

The bullpen was stocked with potential sign-and-flip guys over the offseason, and a few of those veteran arms have had good runs that could earn them a similar fate to the bulk of last year’s relief corps. Anthony Swarzak, Tommy Kahnle, David Robertson, Dan Jennings and Tyler Clippard were all dealt away last summer. Could Hahn employ a similar strategy this season?

The bullpen hasn’t been quite as good as it was last year, which made all of those players attractive additions for contending teams around the league. But veterans like Joakim Soria, Luis Avilan, Bruce Rondon, Xavier Cedeno – guys who hoped to rediscover some old magic – could still draw interest.

Soria owns a 3.12 ERA. Avilan’s is at 3.10. Cedeno hasn’t given up a run in his six relief appearances. Rondon has shown blow-em-away stuff at times. It’s been a nice recovery for some of these sign-and-flip veterans.

“They’ve had an opportunity to get their chances to work on different things and become really effective performers,” manager Rick Renteria said of some of his veteran relievers prior to Sunday’s game. “I think Joakim has risen his level of game back what he was pre last couple years, I think he’s reinvented himself a little bit. He has an up-down breaking ball now, he’s continuing to attack the strike zone, he’s throwing 93 miles an hour with his fastball, he’s commanding the zone. He’s doing everything he can to be as good a closer as he was in the past. His history and his experience also allow him some confidence to be put in situations to close out ballgames.”

Soria could perhaps draw the most interest because closers are often in demand in July. But last year’s trade-a-thon showed that teams are willing to trade prospects away for relief help of any kind. Many of the return pieces in those deals might not get rebuild-loving prospect followers thrilled. Casey Gillaspie and Ryan Cordell haven’t exactly put their names at the forefront of the discussion about 2020 and beyond. But remember that Blake Rutherford came over in the deal that sent Robertson and Kahnle out of town (Todd Frazier went to the New York Yankees in that trade, too). So an acquisition that could improve the rebuild can most definitely happen, even with middle relievers.

There’s no guarantee that any of these guys, be it Shields in the rotation or any of the arms out in the bullpen, will get traded or even draw significant interest. But for a team in the White Sox position, you’d have to assume they’d be open to making a deal and getting something to add to this rebuilding process.