Giants Notes: Free agents Holland, Hundley hope to return

Giants Notes: Free agents Holland, Hundley hope to return

SAN FRANCISCO – Hunter Pence got to give a speech and ride off on a scooter. For other Giants, the end might have come without anyone knowing it, but two key veterans hope that’s not the case.

Derek Holland reiterated before the game that he wants to return to San Francisco next season. Afterward, Nick Hundley said the same. 

SAN FRANCISCO – Hunter Pence got to give a speech and ride off on a scooter. For other Giants, the end might have come without anyone knowing it, but two key veterans hope that’s not the case.

Derek Holland reiterated before the game that he wants to return to San Francisco next season. Afterward, Nick Hundley said the same. 

“This is an amazing place, a one-of-a-kind organization,” Hundley said. “Obviously we didn’t win a whole lot of games this month, but we were right in the thick of it up until the end of August. If we’re healthy, this team is capable of winning a World Series. If I’m able to add to that, I would definitely take the opportunity.”

The Giants do need to shake things up, but these are two decisions that could be easy. Hundley had a one-year, $2.5 million deal and something similar should be in the works. The staff is excited about Aramis Garcia and believes he could handle backup duty, but with Buster Posey rehabbing from major surgery, the preference is to have a veteran in-house, too. Holland made $2 million and gave the Giants a 3.57 ERA in 171 1/3 innings. He’s due a raise, and could be in line for a multi-year deal, but a reunion makes sense. 

— The Giants finished 73-89 a year after losing 98 games. They’ll pick 10th in the draft. That’s a slot where they previously picked up Madison Bumgarner and Tim Lincecum. This wasn’t how they wanted to end it, though. This was embarrassing. They gave up 14 runs in the first five innings. 

“No question, that’s the last way we wanted this thing to go out,” manager Bruce Bochy said. 

Hunter Strickland replaced Andrew Suarez in the third and continued the fireworks, giving up three earned in 1/3 of an inning. Strickland started this season as the closer and did a pretty decent job before punching a door and putting himself on the DL for two months. He finished it with diminished velocity and a 3.97 ERA. Strickland made $1.55 million in arbitration this season and is due a small raise for next year. Will the Giants want to pay a couple million for a right-hander who was stuck in mop-up duty down the stretch? 

Earlier in the day, Brian Sabean spoke with reporters and did not seem to indicate that the Giants plan to non-tender anyone notable, but the new VP/GM will get to make that decision. This will be an interesting one. 

“He never really got in sync when he came back,” Bochy said. “I mean, we’re talking about our closer and he just wasn’t quite right. It just looks like he needs a winter off to get completely healed up.”

— The main story today was Hunter Pence. The funny story today was Brandon Crawford once again changing his teammates’ walk-up songs. 

Stopping Brewers' Christian Yelich will be key for Cubs in NL Central tiebreaker

Stopping Brewers' Christian Yelich will be key for Cubs in NL Central tiebreaker

The debate over whether the CubsBrewers rivalry is real began on Labor Day in Milwaukee when Cole Hamels suggested Cubs fans’ invasion of Miller Park proved it was not.

We’ll find out just how hot the rivalry is Monday when the Cubs and Brewers play Game 163 at Wrigley Field (12:05 p.m., ESPN), a tiebreaker to determine the division champion and the wild-card team.

“I don’t think it really matters if we think it’s a rivalry or not,” Brewers outfielder Christian Yelich said during a recent interview. “It’s two really good teams, and I think that’s been proven on the field. All that other stuff is for you guys to debate, whether it’s a rivalry. It is or it isn’t.

“There have been a lot of tightly contested games and there is a lot of talent on both sides. It’s really fun to be a part of. The atmosphere is great and I really enjoy when we play each other. They’re a tough team, a great team, and we have a lot of fun anytime we get together. I guess time will tell.”

How the Cubs can stop Yelich will be the biggest question in Monday’s tiebreaker, the first at Wrigley since the 1998 wild-card tiebreaker, in which the Cubs beat the Giants to move on to the NL Division Series.

READ MORE: Cubs rally for 10-5 win, play host to Brewers in Monday tiebreaker »

Yelich is the odds-on favorite for the NL Most Valuable Player award and also has a chance to win the Triple Crown.

“He’s had a bunch of moments like, ‘Did he just do that again?’” manager Craig Counsell said. “That’s what you’re kind of saying to yourself — ‘Can he do it again?’ And he keeps doing it. It’s fun to watch players like that, when great players get in those moments.”

So will manager Joe Maddon pitch around Yelich, as he did with Bryce Harper during a memorable series in 2016?

The Cubs have handled Yelich so far this year. He has hit .175 (10-for-57) in 15 games against the Cubs, with no home runs and five RBIs.

But he has been the hottest hitter in baseball in the second half, and the stakes obviously are much higher now.

Yelich said he didn’t really care whether or not they faced the Cubs in October. The teams could still meet in the division series no matter who wins Monday.

“It’s a great team, and you don’t really have a say in who you play on the playoffs,” he said. “You’ve just got to get in. Obviously if we end up matching up I think it’d be a great series. I really do. I think it would be really close, every single game. I don’t think it would be dissimilar to any of the games that we’ve played at the end of this year.”

The addition of Yelich and Lorenzo Cain certainly put the Brewers in position to compete with the Cubs, though they have been in the same area code for the last two years.

“I’m proud that we have the organization in a healthy place, and I also recognize the amount of work ahead of us for us to accomplish the type of things the Cubs have accomplished over the last half decade,” Brewers general manager David Stearns said.

Asked if a Cubs-Brewers playoff series would be good for baseball, Stearns instead said it would be a “great thing” for the two markets.

“We know that team very well,” he said. “They know us very well. We’ve had some of the better regular-season games I’ve ever been part of against that team. It does make you think what a playoff series could be like.”

Game 163 will bring the Brewers into the national spotlight, a place they are unaccustomed to because of their small-market status.

“We’re not really too concerned with the national spotlight, how well we get covered,” Yelich said. “We control what we can control, and that’s winning games. If you win enough games, the notoriety and everything else takes care of itself. …

“Anything can happen, and it can happen fast.”

Yelich’s rise to potential MVP is proof of that.

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Kris Bryant healthy enough that postseason rest may be unnecessary »

Paul Sullivan: The pulsating Cubs-Brewers race in the NL Central is good to the last drop »

Joe Maddon jokingly offers use of his RV to Ron Gardenhire if Tigers beat the Brewers »

Red Sox Notes: J.D. Martinez Makes His Mark In Boston History With 43rd Home Run

Red Sox Notes: J.D. Martinez Makes His Mark In Boston History With 43rd Home Run

J.D. Martinez was signed by the Red Sox in the offseason to help make an impact in the Boston lineup.

And he certainly delivered.

The slugger ended the regular season with 130 RBIs and 43 home runs, which etched him into Red Sox history. With his three-run round-tripper in the fourth inning of Sunday’s 10-2 win over the New York Yankees, he surpassed Dick Stuart for most home runs during a player’s first year with Boston. Stuart held the record since 1963.

Aside from breaking a 55-year-old record, Martinez’s RBIs and homers also leave him among some pretty elite company.

Although it was a season for the record books for No. 28, the postseason now is a priority for Boston.

“It’s been fun. The guys have been great,” Martinez said after the game, as seen on NESN’s postgame coverage. “It was exciting but now we’re focused on the playoffs.”

Here are some other notes from Sunday’s Red Sox-Yankees game:

— Mookie Betts ended the regular season with an American League-leading .346 average to go along with 47 doubles, 32 home runs, 80 RBIs, 129 runs scored and 30 stolen bases.

“I knew he was good, but to see it on a daily basis is eye-opening,” Sox manager Alex Cora said after the game. “From day one in Spring Training he put the work (in), he’s a good student of the game.”

Betts had a stellar campaign for the Red Sox, and if you ask Martinez, he’s a no-brainer to win the American League MVP award.

“If he’s not your MVP I don’t know who is,” Martinez said.

— The Red Sox finished the season with the best record in Major League Baseball at 108-54.

“We kept playing good baseball. They did a good job,” Cora said. “Got better throughout (the season), defensively, running the bases. It was a total team effort. It was a solid season.”

— After a less-than-stellar outing in Saturday’s loss when he surrendered three earned runs on four hits with two walks, Eduardo Rodriguez bounced back with a scoreless, hitless fifth inning that included two strikeouts.

“A lot better than yesterday,” Cora said. “I talked to him last night (and said) ‘Hey man, you got one inning tomorrow. We have to pitch with some conviction.’ And he did.”

— Boston will begin the ALDS on Friday at Fenway Park, with its opponent to be determined Tuesday night with the Oakland Athletics and Yankees fighting for a chance at the World Series title.

Thumbnail photo via Brian Fluharty/USA TODAY Sports Images

Brewers pound Tigers to force NL Central tiebreaker

Brewers pound Tigers to force NL Central tiebreaker

EditorsNote: Updates with Cubs result, tiebreaker tomorrow

Jesus Aguilar homered and drove in three runs, and the Milwaukee Brewers clinched a first-place tie in the National League Central Division by pummeling the visiting Detroit Tigers 11-0 on Sunday.

With the Cubs beating the Cardinals later Sunday, the Brewers will visit Wrigley Field on Monday to decide the division title. Milwaukee (95-67) finished the 162-game schedule on a seven-game winning streak.

Ryan Braun supplied two hits, two runs and two RBIs, while Orlando Arcia also drove in two runs. Travis Shaw added a solo homer.

Most Valuable Player candidate Christian Yelich went 0-for-2 with two walks and scored twice. Yelich was removed from the game during the top of the eighth and received a standing ovation from the home crowd.

Starter Gio Gonzalez (10-11) pitched the minimum five innings to get the victory. He scattered three hits and struck out two.

Detroit starter Spencer Turnbull (0-2) gave up four runs on five hits in 5 1/3 innings and struck out a season-high seven.

The Tigers (64-98), who were swept in the three-game series, had two runners on with two out in the first, but Mikie Mahtook grounded out.

Milwaukee scored two runs in the bottom of the inning. Yelich and Braun drew one-out walks. Following a fielder’s choice, Yelich scored on Aguilar’s infield hit. Mike Moustakas then ripped an RBI single to right.

Aguilar made it 3-0 when he drilled an opposite-field, leadoff homer in the fourth.

The Brewers loaded the bases in the sixth on singles by Braun and Shaw and a walk drawn by Moustakas. Manny Pina’s sacrifice fly knocked in Braun for a 4-0 advantage.

Milwaukee upped its lead to double digits with six runs in the seventh. Braun smoked a two-run double with the bases loaded and no one out. Following a groundout, another run scored on Aguilar’s fielder’s-choice grounder. When the throw home bounced past catcher James McCann, Braun also scored.

Arcia’s two-run single made it 10-0.

—Field Level Media

After 162 games of a wild 2018 Brewers season, here's a reason to remember each and every game

After 162 games of a wild 2018 Brewers season, here's a reason to remember each and every game

The 2018 Milwaukee Brewers season was full of some pretty amazing moments, though 162 games will obviously run together no matter how intently fans watch every pitch. 

Let’s steal an idea from the 1990s sitcom “Friends,” which named its episodes based on how you might describe or remember them (“The One With the Evil Orthodontist” or “The One With Ross’s Sandwich” are examples). Here are the 162 games in the Brewers season and how you might remember each.

March 29: Brewers 2, Padres 1. The one where Chase Anderson slammed his face on home plate.

March 30: Brewers 8, Padres 6. The one where Ryan Braun hit a thrilling late home run while we were all sleeping.

March 31: Brewers 7, Padres 3. The one where Christian Yelich first went 5-for-5 (and that Ryan Braun-Matt Kemp rumor popped up).

April 2: Cardinals 8, Brewers 4. The home opener where Lorenzo Cain leaned back for his first bomb.

April 3: Brewers 5, Cardinals 4. The one that started back-to-back and ended back-to-back.

April 4: Cardinals 6, Brewers 0. The one where Christian Yelich tweaked his oblique (no!).

April 5: Cubs 8, Brewers 0. The one where Corey Knebel looked like he seriously injured his hamstring.

April 6: Brewers 5, Cubs 4. The one where Orlando Arcia walked it off with game-winning single.

April 7: Cubs 5, Brewers 2. The one where the Brewers coughed up four runs in the ninth (infield defense … eek).

April 8: Cubs 3, Brewers 0. The one where Jose Quintana just continued to infuriate the Brewers.

April 9: Brewers 5, Cardinals 4 (10). The one where Greg Holland walked four guys in an inning and the Brewers won in extras.

April 10: Cardinals 5, Brewers 3 (11). The one where the Brewers lost a lead in the ninth and 10th before Matt Carpenter’s walk-off in the 11th.

April 11: Brewers 3, Cardinals 2. The one that was on Facebook (the first time).

April 13: Mets 6, Brewers 5. The one where Todd Frazier homered twice and the Mets went to 11-1. LOL the Mets ended up being so bad, though.

April 14: Brewers 5, Mets 1. The one where Josh Hader first started getting national notoriety (five strikeouts in six-out save)

April 15: Mets 3, Brewers 2. The one where former-future Brewer Wilmer Flores walked it off

April 16: Reds 10, Brewers 4. The one where Jacob Nottingham made his Major League debut.

April 17: Brewers 2, Reds 0. The one where Eric Thames provided all the offense with a two-run homer for the first of two straight games

April 18: Brewers 2, Reds 0. The one where Eric Thames provided all the offense with a two-run homer for the second straight game (and the Christian Yelich tip drill).

April 19: Brewers 12, Marlins 3. The one where Lewis Brinson returned and Ryan Braun reached 1,000 career RBIs.

April 20: Brewers 8, Marlins 0. The one where Brewers went triple (Yelich), homer (Braun), homer (Shaw) on three pitches against a former Miller Coors employee (Richards).

April 21: Brewers 6, Marlins 5. The one with Jesus Aguilar’s 13-pitch walk-off homer.

April 22: Brewers 4, Marlins 2. The one where Jonathan Villar celebrated a homer with Gatorade cups all over his face.

April 24: Brewers 5, Royals 2. The one where Lorenzo Cain returned to Kansas City and homered.

April 25: Brewers 6, Royals 2. The one where the Brewers won for the eighth straight game.

April 26: Cubs 1, Brewers 0. The one where all it took was a swing by Kyle Schwarber.

April 27: Cubs 3, Brewers 2. The one where Yu Darvish seemed just fine (even if he’s struggling against everyone else).

April 28: Cubs 3, Brewers 0. The one where … man, Jose Quintana is so annoying.

April 29: Cubs 2, Brewers 0. The one where the Brewers got swept in Wrigley and everyone was asking if they can “beat good teams.”

April 30: Brewers 6, Reds 5. The Josh Hader Game (eight strikeouts, nine batters, historic save).

May 1: Brewers 7, Reds 6. The one where it was officially apparent that Jeremy Jeffress was in the midst of a special year.

May 2: Brewers 3, Reds 1. The one where Wade Miley debuted and fared well, and Brett Phillips emerged from under the dugout.

May 4: Pirates 6, Brewers 4. The one where Starling Marte hit an inside-the-park home run.

May 5: Brewers 5, Pirates 3. The one where Ryan Braun was clutch again with a two-run double in the eighth.

May 6: Pirates 9, Brewers 0. The one where nothing went right against Chad Kuhl.

May 8: Brewers 3, Indians 2. The Brent Suter Game (on defense, pitching and with his home run against reigning AL Cy Young winner Corey Kluber).

May 9: Indians 6, Brewers 2. The one where Corey Knebel returned way earlier than anyone expected.

May 10: Brewers 5, Rockies 2. The one where Lo Cain started the game with a homer and the Brewers racked up 11 more hits from there.

May 11: Brewers 11, Rockies 10 (10). The one where the Brewers were down, 9-3, and rallied back in a thriller, with Manny Pina’s two-out, two-run homer tying the game in the ninth.

May 12: Rockies 4, Brewers 0. The one where not much is remarkable, but the previous win was so ridiculous.

May 13: Brewers 7, Rockies 3. The Freddy Peralta debut on Mother’s Day.

May 14: Brewers 7, Diamondbacks 2. The one where Tyler Saladino hit an inside-the-park homer.

May 15: Diamondbacks 2, Brewers 1. The one where Orlando Arcia was playing with Hernan Perez’s hair.

May 16: Brewers 8, Diamondbacks 2. The one jump-started by back to back blasts by Travis Shaw and Domingo Santana

May 18: Brewers 8, Twins 3. The one where Ji-Man Choi rejoined the team and homered in his first at-bat.

May 19: Brewers 5, Twins 4. The one where Freddy battled in his second start, but a late Yelich homer helped Crew prevail.

May 20: Twins 3, Brewers 1. The one where the Brewers couldn’t do much against former franchise prospect Jake Odorizzi

May 21: Brewers 4, Diamondbacks 2. The one where the Brewers homered three times against Greinke.

May 22: Brewers 1, Diamondbacks 0. The one where Craig Counsell got ejected to keep his closer in the game.

May 23: Brewers 9, Diamondbacks 2. The one where the Brewers scored seven runs in the fourth and got off to the best 50-game start in club history (31-19)

May 24: Mets 5, Brewers 0. The one where nobody could retire Brandon Nimmo.

May 25: Brewers 4, Mets 3 (10). The one where Travis Shaw drew a walk-off walk in the 10th after Milwaukee lost the lead in the ninth.

May 26: Brewers 17, Mets 6. The one where, uh, the Brewers scored 17 runs.

May 27: Brewers 8, Mets 7. The one where the Brewers rallied late and Eric Sogard climbed onto the tarp for a catch

May 28: Brewers 8, Cardinals 3. The one where we began to think maybe the Brewers are going to handle the Cardinals this year.

May 29: Cardinals 6, Brewers 1. The one where Michael Wacha was dominating and Tyler Saladino sprained his ankle.

May 30: Brewers 3, Cardinals 2. The one where Alex Reyes came off the DL, then got hurt again, and Arcia delivered another late go-ahead hit

June 1: White Sox 8, Brewers 3. The one where Danny Farquhar came back and maybe inspired the struggling White Sox

June 2: Brewers 5, White Sox 0. The one where the Brewers wore sweet retro uniforms in a win.

June 3: White Sox 6, Brewers 1. The one where everyone kinda started panicking a little bit as Brewers inched back to earth.

June 5: Indians 3, Brewers 2. The one where Corey Kluber didn’t let lightning strike twice.

June 6: Indians 3, Brewers 1. The one where rocker Jack White was in the crowd and actually laughed.

June 8: Brewers 12, Phillies 4. The one where the Brewers exorcised any demons with 11 runs in first four innings, and Lorenzo Cain backed up Orlando Arcia with a slick catch

June 9: Brewers 12, Phillies 3. The one where the Brewers kept swinging against Jake Arrieta, and Ji-Man hit a big grand slam.

June 10: Phillies 4, Brewers 3. The one where the Brewers just kept getting close to series sweeps without finishing them.

June 11: Cubs 7, Brewers (11). The one where Ryan Braun stole a homer and showed some swagger, though the Cubs scored five in the 11th to win.

June 12: Brewers 4, Cubs 0. The one where Lorenzo Cain’s baserunning magic befuddled the Cubs.

June 13: Brewers 1, Cubs 0. The one where Jhoulys Chacin just kept dealing.

June 15: Brewers 13, Phillies 2. The one where the Brewers clobbered Jake Arrieta … again.

June 16: Phillies 4, Brewers 1. The one where Gabe Kapler pinch hit for his closer in the ninth and won anyway.

June 17: Phillies 10, Brewers 9. The one where Eric Thames homered twice without his beard and Adrian Houser lost his lunch on the mound.

June 18: Pirates 1, Brewers 0. The one where struggling Trevor Williams still shut down Milwaukee (though he proceeded to go on a hot streak).

June 19: Brewers 3, Pirates 2. The one where a Pirates fan lost his beer on a pop up behind home plate.

June 21: Brewers 11, Cardinals 3. The one where ghosts haunted the Cardinals starting pitcher and defense.

June 22: Brewers 2, Cardinals 1. The one where Jesus Aguilar homered to break up a no-no in the seventh, then again to win the game.

June 23: Cardinals 3, Brewers 2. The one where Yadier Molina homered twice.

June 24: Cardinals 8, Brewers 2. The one where another Sunday game got out of hand early.

June 26: Brewers 5, Royals 1. The one where Freddy Peralta was dominant again with 10 strikeouts.

June 27: Royals 5, Brewers 4. The one where Josh Hader actually got hit hard.

June 28: Brewers 6, Reds 4. The one where Eric Thames continued to own the Reds with a three-run homer in the seventh (and Joey Votto and Erik Kratz discussed currency exchange rates as benches cleared).

June 29: Brewers 8, Reds 2. The Keon Broxton Game (two homers, four RBIs, diving catch, baserunning maneuver to score).

June 30: Reds 12, Brewers 3. The one where the Reds scored eight runs in an inning before the Brewers even got an out (including a reliever hitting a grand slam)

July 1: Reds 8, Brewers 2. The one where it was rainy and also a bummer

July 2: Brewers 6, Twins 5 (10). The one where Brad Miller simply didn’t swing in extras for a walk-off-walk.

July 3: Brewers 2, Twins 0. The one where Eric Thames hit another 2-run homer in a 2-0 win (and the Brewers allowed just two hits).

July 4: Brewers 3, Twins 2. The one where Nate Orf homered for the first time and Keon Broxton saved the game with his catch at the wall.

July 5: Brewers 7, Braves 2. The one where the Brewers finally signed top draft pick Brice Turang.

July 6: Brewers 5, Braves 4. The Dan Jennings Escape Game.

July 7: Braves 5, Brewers 1. The one where Anibal Sanchez was strangely dominant.

July 8: Brewers 10, Braves 3. The one where Jesus Aguilar hit two home runs and still wasn’t named an All-Star afterward (but three other guys were).

July 9: Marlins 4, Brewers 3 (10). The one where Josh Hader gave up back-to-back bombs and the Brewers lost in the 10th.

July 10: Brewers 8, Marlins 4. The one where Corbin Burnes delivered a sizzling debut (two scoreless innings in relief).

July 11: Marlins 5, Brewers 4 (12). The one where Jesus Aguilar realized he’d won the Final Vote, then went out and raked, but alas, another extra-inning loss.

July 12: Pirates 6, Brewers 3. The one where Jeremy Jeffress was named an All-Star afterward.

July 13: Pirates 7, Brewers 3. The one where sharp-looking Negro League uniforms didn’t change the fortunes of the slumping Brewers.

July 14: Pirates 2, Brewers 1 and Pirates 6, Brewers 2. The ones where Milwaukee’s losing was extended to two in one day.

July 15: Pirates 7, Brewers 6 (10). The worst loss of the year.

July 20: Dodgers 6, Brewers 4. The one where the Brewers had to face Manny Machado right after he got traded to somebody else.

July 21: Brewers 4, Dodgers 2. The one where Josh Hader received an off-putting standing ovation.

July 22: Dodgers 11, Brewers 2. The one where Hernan Perez pitched and hit a guy with a 48-mile-per-hour pitch, and Brent Suter left with injury.

July 23: Brewers 6, Nationals 1. The one where Jhoulys Chacin had another huge outing when the team badly needed an easy win.

July 24: Brewers 5, Nationals 4 (10). The one where Prince Fielder paid a visit and the Brewers rallied from 4-0 to walk it off.

July 25: Nationals 7, Brewers 3. The one where Freddy Peralta just didn’t have it.

July 26: Brewers 7, Giants 5. The one where the Brewers rallied to kickoff a West Coast swing in style (and traded for Joakim Soria earlier in the day).

July 27: Brewers 3, Giants 1. The one where the team used small ball to beat Madison Bumgarner and announced it had traded for Mike Moustakas.

July 28: Brewers 7, Giants 1. The one where the Brewers churned out 14 hits, including one by new guy, Mike Moustakas.

July 29: Giants 8, Brewers 5. The one where the Giants scored a ton early and Matt Albers couldn’t stop the fire from burning.

July 30: Brewers 5, Dodgers 2. The one where Eric Thames just missed a grand slam but hit a 3-run homer in his next at-bat

July 31: Brewers 1, Dodgers 0. The one where Lorenzo Cain drove in the only run and saved another with a leaping catch.

Aug. 1: Dodgers 6, Brewers 4 (10). The one where it felt like playoff baseball in August, even if the outcome was a walk-off loss

Aug. 2: Dodgers 21, Brewers 5. The one where the Brewers allowed a franchise-record number of runs.

Aug. 3: Brewers 5, Rockies 3. The one where Eric Thames walked it off after the Brewers were down to their last out.

Aug. 4: Brewers 8, Rockies 4. The one where a grand slam and 6-0 lead in the first was a heckuva start, though things got dicey at the end.

Aug. 5: Rockies 5, Brewers 4 (11). The one where the Brewers scored three improbable runs in the ninth, only to lose in extras.

Aug. 7: Padres 11, Brewers 5. The one where a 4-0 lead in the first evaporated, and it wouldn’t be the last time.

Aug. 8: Brewers 8, Padres 4. The one where the Brewers didn’t blow a big first-inning lead.

Aug. 9: Padres 8, Brewers 4. The one where the bullpen collapsed to surrender six runs in the ninth in one of the year’s cruelest losses.

Aug. 10: Braves 10, Brewers 1. The one where Freddy Peralta got pounded and the Brewers were in an all-out malaise.

Aug. 11: Brewers 4, Braves 2. The one where Ryan Braun made an insane run-saving catch and the Brewers rallied to win.

Aug. 12: Braves 8, Brewers 7. The one where 19 hits was somehow not enough.

Aug. 14: Brewers 7, Cubs 0. The one where Ryan Braun homered twice and the Brewers shut out the Cubs for a third straight meeting.

Aug. 15: Cubs 8, Brewers 4. The one where things came crashing back to earth.

Aug. 17: Cardinals 5, Brewers 2. The one where Jordan Lyles pitched a second inning, and everyone freaked out.

Aug. 18: Cardinals 7, Brewers 2. The one where the Brewers fell out of a Wild Card spot.

Aug. 19: Brewers 2, Cardinals 1. The one where the Brewers deployed their “winning bullpen” again and held on for dear life.

Aug. 20: Brewers 5, Reds 2. The one where Travis Shaw’s several cracked bats netted a key go-ahead homer.

Aug. 21: Reds 9, Brewers 7. The one where the team couldn’t quite overcome the fourth inning of doom.

Aug 22: Brewers 4, Reds 0.The one where Freddy Peralta was back to dealing, and provided an RBI single while he was at it.

Aug. 24: Brewers 7, Pirates 6 (15). The most improbable win of the season.

Aug. 25: Pirates 9, Brewers 1. The one where the Pirates scored eight runs in the final three innings and … is this bullpen broken?

Aug. 26: Brewers 7, Pirates 4. The one where a six-run inning proved to be enough.

Aug. 28: Reds 9, Brewers 7. The one where Junior Guerra blew up again, and two Christian Yelich homers weren’t enough.

Aug. 29: Brewers 13, Reds 12 (10). The one where Christian Yelich hit for the cycle … and that was just the tip of the iceberg in the craziest game of the year.

Aug. 30: Brewers 2, Reds 1 (11). The one where Lorenzo Cain lit up the first pitch of the 11th in a totally different kind of nail-biter.

Aug. 31: Brewers 4, Nationals 1. The one where Jeremy Jeffress closed it out in the rain.

Sept. 1: Nationals 5, Brewers 4. The one where the Brewers bullpen melted after a two-hour rain delay – and Hader went famously unused.

Sept. 2: Brewers 9, Nationals 4. The one where Christian Yelich hit a grand slam in a seven-run inning.

Sept. 3: Brewers 4, Cubs 3. The one where Cole Hamels wondered if it was really a rivalry (shortly after the Brewers walked off winners).

Sept. 4: Brewers 11, Cubs 1. The one where the giant ‘L’ flag appeared in the left field bleachers.

Sept. 5: Cubs 6, Brewers 4. The one where the Brewers couldn’t quite get all the way back into the NL Central race.

Sept. 7: Brewers 4, Giants 2. The one where three hits were enough, including a huge Jesus Aguilar double.

Sept. 8: Brewers 4, Giants 3. The one where Gio Gonzalez made an encouraging debut and Christian Yelich got “M-V-P” chants.

Sept. 9: Brewers 6, Giants 3. The one where Madison Bumgarner hit Braun with a pitch, and Jonathan Schoop followed with a grand slam.

Sept. 10: Brewers 3, Cubs 2. The one where Josh Hader struck out all six he faced and the Brewers move to within a game of the Cubs.

Sept. 11: Cubs 3, Brewers 0. The one where … man, I hope the Brewers don’t see Jose Quintana in the playoffs.

Sept. 12: Brewers 5, Cubs 1. The one where Curtis Granderson hit the triple that bounced on the wire of the Wrigley Field basket (and they’re one game back in the Central!).

Sept. 14: Brewers 7, Pirates 4. The one where Orlando Arcia hit the bunt double.

Sept. 15: Pirates 3, Brewers 1. The one where we just got sadder after the Badgers lost to BYU.

Sept. 16: Pirates 3, Brewers 2. The one where two quick ninth-inning homers made it interesting but wasn’t quite enough.

Sept. 17: Brewers 8, Reds 0. The one where Christian Yelich hit for the cycle … AGAIN.

Sept. 18: Reds 3, Brewers 1. The one where the offense got nothing going and it became clear: this team wasn’t winning the division.

Sept. 19: Brewers 7, Reds 0. The one where it became clear acquiring Gio was better than getting Matt Harvey, and Manny Pina hit a 13-pitch HR.

Sept. 21: Brewers 8, Pirates 3. The one where everything got better after a rain delay.

Sept. 22: Pirates 3, Brewers 0. The one where it’s nice to know Milwaukee won’t have to face Trevor Williams again.

Sept. 23: Brewers 13, Pirates 6. The one where the Brewers scored three runs on a wild pitch.

Sept. 24: Brewers 6, Cardinals 4. The one where Dan Jennings “started’ for one batter (and the Brewers scored a massive win).

Sept. 25: Brewers 13, Cardinals 4. The one where Christian Yelich probably locked up the MVP award.

Sept. 26: Brewers 2, Cardinals 1. The one where the Brewers clinched a playoff spot (and a guy fell down between third and home).

Sept. 28: Brewers 6, Tigers 5. The one where Ryan Braun’s go-ahead homer in the eighth was caught — and then dropped over the fence.

Sept. 29: Brewers 6, Tigers 5. The one where Christian Yelich became a legitimate Triple Crown threat and the Brewers tied for first in the Central.

Sept. 30: Brewers 11, Tigers 0. The one where they forced Game 163.